Header over french door sagging


  #1  
Old 06-02-04, 10:41 AM
berettafan
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Header over french door sagging

Hello again folks. I posted previously about a sagging problem under my 4 year old home. I have since found that the floor and beams under it are dead level or close enough to it to not be the problem. After further investigation I have found that the upstairs floor is sagging. The center of the sagging (as per my checks with a level) appears to be directly over the center of a double door opening on the first floor.

So I believe this means my problem is a weak header over said opening. I also have somewhat bouncy joists but that is apparently an unrelated problem. So, my question is how do I fix a sagging header? The carpet is torn up in our bedroom (which, along with our closet and bathroom is over the offending opening) and I have removed one 4x8 subfloor sheet already. So I have access from above.

Do I need to jack the thing up from the double doorway on the first floor? Then what? I am at a total loss as to how to reinforce this thing. I suspect it may involve drywall removal (easy enough) and replacement (gee honey, I think the uncovered studs have a nice look about them).

My plan for the bouncy joists is to either sister 2x8's 80% of the lenght (wires in the way just before the header) or to nail blocks between them to help spread the load. Does this sound like a winner to you guys?
 
  #2  
Old 06-02-04, 06:23 PM
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Eastlake, OH
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Ok. It sounds like the header is too small for the load. First I would remove the drywall above the door to see if they have cripples installed. If so this will allow you to increase the header size by removing the cripples and replacing with the proper size header. If however, the whole space is filled by header you will need to take another path. If regular lumber was used they often put a inch spacer between two boards to make the header. You can fill this space instead with steel the same size of the header drill holes and bolt together. If you have the space however I would go with the increased header size using LVL lumber. As for removing the existing header I would use screw jacks with I beam headers on both sides of the door for temporary bracing while working on the header. And I think the cross bracing in the joists will help. Hope this helps and good luck
 
  #3  
Old 06-03-04, 01:17 PM
A
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homer seems to be spot on with his advice I will only add to you comment below

"My plan for the bouncy joists is to either sister 2x8's 80% of the lenght (wires in the way just before the header) or to nail blocks between them to help spread the load. Does this sound like a winner to you guys?"

The sistering of joists isn't going to help much because you are only going about 80%. That will only increase the dead load that the joist is exposed to and won't do anything for the problem. So it sounds like a waste of time effort and money. The blocking idea might help the horizontal movement of the joists but it won't help spread the load. Isuggest removing the wires sistering the joists then re-installing the wires. I know it is a Pain to do but if you are going to all htis effort you want the solution to work.
 
 

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