Small subfloor

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  #1  
Old 07-16-04, 05:29 PM
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Small subfloor

I haven't chercked if my local code allows it yet but...

I want to add a small platform or subfloor in my garage which has a door leading to my kitchen. The platform would be about 4 feet by 8 feet. I will enclose this area with a wall so it will seem to be a small laundry room. The garage floor is 15 inches below kitchen floor. What would be best way to make up the height difference. The dryer exhaust vent must run under this platform to existing vent hole.. I'm thinking 2x10's topped by 2x4's laid flat and crosswise, followed by 1 or more sheets of plywood as needed. How woud a pro do it? The cement floor gets miserably cold in the winter, how should it be insulated?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-16-04, 07:15 PM
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15 inches...hmmmmmm....

I think I would frame up a floor of 2x6's, get some 4x4's and cut to length to make the height you want. Place the 4x4 posts at least every other space (32" apart) side nailed into the 2x6's(I know 32" is probably overkill but as short as they are, you won't use very many extra 4x4's anyway) and it would be better, if you feel comfortable doing it, if the 4x4's were notched so the 2x6's would sit in the notch instead of the nails holding all the weight. The 4x4's also give alot more flexibility as far as height goes...if you try to "build-up" 2-by lumber, you could make it meet the 15" doorway but you would be using alot more material than you need to...I tried to figure it up, and if I did it correctly, you COULD use two "frame-ups" of 2x6's (5 1/2" each), two layer of 2x4's(or any 2x lumber) layed flat (1 1/2" each) then 2 layers of 1/2" plywood...or...you could use the two "frame-ups" of 2x6's (5 1/2" each), one frame up of 2x4's (3 1/2"), and ONE layer of 1/2" plywood, but I dont personally like using only 1/2" plywood for a floor...either way thats ALOTTTT more material than you need to buy.

Incedentally, if you aren't comfortable notching 4x4's you can use 2x4's and cut one say 5" shorter than the other and nail em together, basically forming a "notch" for the 2x6 to sit in.

ok...assuming its exactly 15" u would have to cut the short 2x4 to 8 3/4", and the long one to 13 3/4"(or close to that but NOT over 14 1/4")

here's my math in case I messed it up....check me before you proceed (if you're even going to do it this way)...here it is.....8 3/4" (short 2x4) - plus - 5 1/2" (2x6 framing) - plus - 3/4" plywood - equals(i think) - 15"

another thought, before cutting anything buy the materials and check the REAL thickness of the plywood and adjust the short 2x4 side of the "posts" accordingly.

This makes the dryer vent easy too, just run it under and between the posts.

Insulation can be anything u want, fiberglass (pink, itchy, you know the stuff )would be easiest, staple it, paper side up, to the top of the 2x6's before you cover them with plywood.

hope this helps, post back any questions and I'll try my darndest
 
  #3  
Old 07-16-04, 07:15 PM
Join Date: Feb 2004
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Ok, you probably will be able to do it but they will likely want it to be fire rated. Get their requirements for this. As for the base I would go with this. Pressure treated 2x4 flat on the floor like a seal plate. Lay this out to your rooms outer measurements. We are up to 1 1/2. You will want to secure this to the floor using Topcon screws. Next layout your band and floor joists using 2x12. Up to 13. Now you will want to use plywood sub floor 13 . inch plywood for your finish floor. 14 . This will leave you with inch to play with to match the finish of your existing floor. As for the insulation R-19 should suffice you may want to lay some plastic on the slab floor cut inside the 2x4s for moisture as well. Hope I was clear and helpful, Good Luck
 
  #4  
Old 07-16-04, 07:19 PM
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whoa...i like homer's idea better...good job man ...
 
  #5  
Old 07-16-04, 07:29 PM
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I try my best But its not better just another approach
 
  #6  
Old 07-16-04, 11:08 PM
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Smile

Thanks guys. I liked both ideas, but since jproffer suggests using Homers way, thats what Ill do.
 
  #7  
Old 08-07-04, 05:53 PM
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Smile What about the ceiling?

This sounds like the kind of info I need for my project. I have an unheated laundry room on concrete slab next to my kitchen which is on a crawl space--so there is about 15 inches to step down from the kitchen to the laundry room. I had thought I would lay a sill around the perimeter somehow and build up and hang joists from there. Still in the design/"thinking about it" phase.

My biggest problem is that the ceiling in the laundry room is also lower than the ceiling in the kitchen. THe ceiling is only a couple of inches above the door jam on the laundry room side. There is storage space above this area in the attic. WOuld a tray ceiling be possible to raise the ceiling 12 inches or so?
 
  #8  
Old 08-07-04, 06:46 PM
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maybe some of the pro's know, but I'm not sure what you mean by "tray ceiling"
 
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