How much can be primed?


  #1  
Old 09-07-04, 08:32 AM
jposada
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How much can be primed?

Hi, guys...new member/first post.

Some background: We're just coming into the last phase of an extensive bathroom reconstruction. We bought a fixer/up knowing it would need repairs, to find out that the for the last four years opr more, the previous owner had the bathtub draining onto the dirt under the house and the everything under the bathroom including the supports holding it up were completely rotted. (don't ask about the inspection...that's a matter that we may be discussing with our attorney)

So, now that we have new 3' deep cement footers, new pressure treated beams and supports, new framing, new insullation, new ceiling, new copper/PVC plumbing, new wiring, new fixtures, new greenboard, new door, new recessed lighting, and new subflooring with the plastering/taping over the next few days, we're getting ready consider how to finish the surfaces. However, we want to live with the bathroom for a few weeks before taking this last step to determine if there are any adjustments or changes we'd like to make.

At the same time, I don't want to subject the new plaster and flooring to any moisture damage that I can help.

This brings me to my question.

Can I paint EVERYTHING, including the floor with a good paint primer in preparation to finishing in a few weeks? I'm not so much questioning the walls and ceiling, but will painting the floor lead to any issues when it comes time to put down the self-leveling cement and floor tiles (or whatever we pick)?
 
  #2  
Old 09-07-04, 09:59 AM
MagusOfAtlan
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Paint won't be adhesive enough to allow tiles and such to stick to it.

There are adhesive self-leveling/sealing/anti-mold compounds that are much better for use in this situation.

Check out Home Depot (or similar store) I believe near the floor tile area (or ask someone there), and they'll be able to direct you to the products. The one I used had to have a powder mixed with a liquid, which is stirred until smooth and applied, then it hardens (quickly). You then sand it down and put tile/vinyl/whatever over it.
 
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Old 09-07-04, 10:04 AM
awesomedell's Avatar
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The new drywall needs to be primed with a PVA primer, I would shy away from painting the newly installed subfloor, as this may create some issues with your finish flooring as you have suspected.
 
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Old 09-07-04, 10:13 AM
jposada
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How much can be primed?

Originally Posted by MagusOfAtlan
Check out Home Depot (or similar store) I believe near the floor tile area (or ask someone there), and they'll be able to direct you to the products. The one I used had to have a powder mixed with a liquid, which is stirred until smooth and applied, then it hardens (quickly). You then sand it down and put tile/vinyl/whatever over it.
Thanks...question: How quickly? If I apply it in the early evening, can it be walked on by the next morning?
 
  #5  
Old 09-08-04, 06:19 AM
MagusOfAtlan
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It dries in about 15 minutes, and perhaps within 60 minutes it's complete. Very quick-drying stuff.

It dries so quickly that whatever bucket you use to mix it in will be destroyed by the remains because it hardens so fast, as info.

You do have to sand it smooth after it dries as well.
 
 

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