Raising wall height and trusses


  #1  
Old 09-28-04, 12:11 PM
dunno
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Raising wall height and trusses

I have an old ranch with an old roof. The rafters are 2x4s with no ridge. I also have low ceilings, approx 7'5". To fix both problems I am going to replace the roof, rafters and all, and at the same time add a steeper pitch with dormers. What is the best way to increase the height of the walls? My local lumberyard says to just add some more plates, but that doesn't sound that stable to me. I'd like to get them up to 8'1" before adding the new rafters or
trusses, scissor trusses over living room. I've heard some bad things about trusses. Help there would also be appreciated.

thanks
dunno
 
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Old 09-30-04, 04:21 AM
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Adding the additional plates would work fine IMO. Personally I never stick build roofs unless I absolutely have to, we just put a new roof over an existing deck to turn it into a covered and screened in porch. Trusses were 23' long, 4:12 pitch, cost $55 ea, delivered to the site. With the assistance of customer's frontloader on farm tractor, myself and 2 helpers had trusses up & set, roof sheeted, flashed, & felted in in a short day, about 6 hrs. Would have taken a whole day to frame that out by hand, then you've got your sheeting, etc to do the next day. I've probably set like a thousand trusses over the past few yrs, never had a problem or a callback. Im my book it's $$ well spent.
 
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Old 09-30-04, 12:47 PM
dunno
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Thanks for your help, I'll go with the trussess. Someone told me there's a possibility of movement or expansion in the trussess that might crack your ceiling finish. Something to do with cold air on the outside and warm on the inside of the scissor truss.

thanks
dunno
 
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Old 10-03-04, 10:05 PM
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Best advice on keeping the drywall from cracking is to insure that the framing lumber is dry prior to installing the sheetrock. If there's too much moisture content in the framing it will dry after the heating system is turned on and will then shrink, causing your rock to crack at the seams and joints.
 
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Old 10-04-04, 07:32 AM
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the problem with trusses is when

you have large spans. Especialy scissor trusses with high pitches. They are suject to horizontal displacement. One end needs to be pinned and the other end needs to be able to move or it may cause the wall to move. IF the spans are less than about 30' or so it really shouldn't be a big issue
 
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Old 10-04-04, 04:03 PM
dunno
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If one end of the scissor truss is allowed to move, I don't know how you would frame it to accomplish this, wouldn't that cause the finish on the ceilng to crack?
t/y
dunno
 
 

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