Roughing in for a tub

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Old 10-01-04, 05:26 PM
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Roughing in for a tub

How much oversized (60" dim) should the opening be for a standard 60" tub (3 wall alcove)?
 
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Old 10-02-04, 12:06 AM
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abkent,

It should be the same size as the tub.

This is due to the fact that the tub flange or tub lip will site flush to the bare wall studs then finish work is done over the lip/flange. This is anchored to the wall to prevent movement.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 10-02-04, 05:28 PM
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Standard rough opening for a 60" tub is always 60-1/4".
 
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Old 10-02-04, 05:41 PM
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Joe Carola,

Rough openings are not always framed in 1/4" over the size of the fixture.

Manufacturers have these stated as thier instructions "Stud opening tolerance (+ 1/4 0)" .

The best way to answer this and avoid any confusion is to read the installation instructions.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 10-02-04, 07:01 PM
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Doug,

So far in the past 20 years any house or addition I have framed every plumber or supply house told me to frame the rough openings for a Standard 60' tub 60-1/4". Your probably right what the tub manufacturer say about the tolerances (+ 1/4" - 0") but every job I've been on and any other contractor I know frames the rough openings 60-1/4".

Jacuzzis and whirlpools are all different rough openings.
 
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Old 10-03-04, 11:28 AM
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60" is fine.

While adding 1/4" to the rough opening of a bathtub frame doesn't hurt, it likely won't help much if at all either.

For what it's worth, I've been building for 25+ years and never framed a tub opening more than 60" and have never had any problems fitting a tub.
 
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Old 10-03-04, 11:38 AM
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homebild,

I agree, but I give Joe credit if he has framed rough openings 60 1/4". It's just not the normal framing practice. I got about 37 years in the business with less than half as a General Contactor and the last 9 have been design/drafting but rarely have I ever done this as I go off of the plan diemnsions. If it says a number, that's what it gets built as. If they are wrong, at least it's not my fault! Even the architects draw stud to stud - 60" for standard tubs. In some cases, doing it the 60 1/4" because that's what you do can lead to trouble for built-ins, custom or not.

No offense Joe but you are not wrong doing it your way but the majority is done as homebild and I describe.

As I mentioned before Joe, the member should follow any instructions per rough ins of their bath fixtures or for that matter anything that has instructions! (Not that I ever read them)

Thanks Homebild for your comments
 
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Old 10-03-04, 01:24 PM
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This is just another example of doing things different ways and both ways working. I've done it this way for all these years because every plumber I met asked me too so never having a problem we continue to do so. Is it right or wrong who knows you guys frame 60" and never had a complaint from any plumber or sheetrocker and I frame 60-1/4" and never had a complaint or problem.

Jacuzzi's we follow all instructions as per modle.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 07:35 AM
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Acrylic Tub Installation

I have a question on this subject. I am installing a 5' acrylic tub and the directions state to set it in plastic covered 2" thinset or mortar and secure the tile flange to the stud by drilling a hole in the flange and using galvanized nails. i was thinging two things. Should I have a support under the tile flange secured to the wall, such as a 2x4, and, should I use stainless hardware rather than galvanized? Any suggestions of comments would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 08-08-08, 12:02 PM
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tub

thank you joe, for framing a tub wall right. i am a plumber.
i have set 100.s of tubs, what you carpenters don't know
is that ,when we don't have the extra 1/4 inch and need it.
we hit the bottom of the wall with a slsdge hammer.ever wonder why the tub wall is not plumb . tubs are not perfict 60 inch's. some need an extra 1/4 inch.
all the carpenters that i know. frame the extra 1/4..
some dumb-a^&&*(*( FRAME THEM 59 3/4 we beat the hell out of his walls. oh and another thing, we caught a carpenter, peeing in the corner,where our copper stubs up.
somebody pee'ed in the box of nails...
 
 

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