leveling a subfloor


  #1  
Old 10-02-04, 12:10 PM
hearmeroar(o:
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leveling a subfloor

due to a recurring problem with a leaking toilet i pulled it again yesterday and ended up needing to remove the underlayment also as it was rippled down to the bottom layer from the moisture. i am now at the subflooring which isn't too bad for a house that's over 200 yrs old but there is an area from one of the walls out to about 8-10" which has the significant gradual drop of about 1/2". there's one board in particular (the 2nd one out from the wall) which just won't sit right for the full length, no matter how much pounding i do on it. my question is this....should i remove the section of the floorboard that is causing the largest problem and replace it (hoping that it is indeed that board as opposed to the joist) or should i perch the edge of the new underlayment on the floorboard that is right next to the wall and then lay lathe or some such thing every 4-6" or so to provide a 'lift' to level the entire floor out? then after the new underlayment then do i put down tarpaper before applying the hardboard before the final flooring choice?
any suggestions wouold be more than welcome
thanks!
 

Last edited by hearmeroar(o:; 10-02-04 at 12:12 PM. Reason: forgot a piece
  #2  
Old 10-03-04, 06:08 AM
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If this was me doing this, and we're just talking about a bathroom, so it's what 8'x10', or something close to that, I would opt to remove all of the plank flooring and lay new exterior grade plywood on the floor. I imagine that your problem with the one board has to do with joists more than the board itself.

Only time I use felt over a subfloor is when installing a hardwood for a finish floor. If you're using vinyl tile or a sheet vinyl or lineolum product, it needs to be glued down over a clean smooth surface. If you opt for tile, first you must check out the framing beneath to make sure it will support the weight of the tile. Generally if the joists size, span, and spacing will support the tile you lay 2 layers of 5/8" exterior plywood, followed by a layer of CBU, laid in thinset and screwed down every 8" over that.
 
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Old 10-03-04, 06:22 AM
hearmeroar(o:
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ok, but what if it was me doing this?? hahaha just kidding
anyway, so you're saying to rip out the entire subflooring right down to the joists? is it then kosher to attach new 2x4 to the old joists at a point that's level rather than using shims etc. to remedy the situation? and you're saying if i am planning on tiling the bathroom floor it needs the support of two layers of 5/8" plywood underneath? yikes. oh, btw, this is a very very small bathroom...not even 5x5. one more thing....i don't have the tool collection i'd like to have, or even need at some points...what's the best and safest way to cut out the old subfloor planks without disturbing the joists if i don't have a circular saw? drill lots of holes and then chisel them out?
thanks for the help
carol
 
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Old 10-03-04, 09:56 PM
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You don't have a circle saw?! Well you need one.

Ok so no need to panic, you can always rent one for a few bucks or you could probably pick one up for $20 or less at a local pawn shop. Set it so the blade will just barely penetrate the planks, but try to not get into the joists. You need to get as close to the walls as possible, if the base boards haven't been removed do that first. Once you've got the planks cut thru, pry them up and send 'em to the dumpster. I would really recommend using an exterior grade plywood for the new subfloor sheeting, but a decent plywood of any type beats osb or particle board, especially in the bathrm. Once you have removed the old flooring you can then sister in some scabs on your joists to bring the floor back to level. This would really be the best option IMO.
 
 

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