Replace kitchen subfloor--with concrete?


  #1  
Old 10-04-04, 08:24 AM
Krick's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 26
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Replace kitchen subfloor--with concrete?

I should apologize for my ignorance right off the bat--I'm new to home improvements, and I'm going to need to learn.

My husband and I just bought a 150+ year old federal in New England, and it needs some love. One of the major problems (aside from the joists in the cellar, the roof, and the chimneys ) is the kitchen, which needs gutting from the ground up. To get into details:

The floor tilts significantly towards the back of the kitchen (which is also the back of the house). There is the very real possibility of a sill replacement job, but I'm also very concerned about the subfloor itself. This part of the ground floor is not above the cellar, so I can only assume that the subfloor is resting on dirt/rocks/etc. (If it were on solid stone, I doubt it would tilt so unevenly, so my guess is that it's on dirt.) My plan is to rip the whole sucker up and build a new subfloor down there, and there's the rub.

In a cold climate, with lots of rain and snow, and a demonstrated history of rotting wood, what would be ideal here? One friend of mine suggested pouring a concrete slab, but I don't know enough to judge the idea. Is it good? If so, would I pour the slab, then lay joists on top of it? Help!
 
  #2  
Old 10-04-04, 10:27 PM
awesomedell's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 2,425
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Krick & welcome.

Pouring a slab is one idea, but might prove to costly and time consuming. Another thought might be to install some concrete footings in the underneath in the crawlspace and using them to support new joists & subfloor. A lot less concrete involved, just a thought.
 
  #3  
Old 10-05-04, 07:04 AM
Krick's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 26
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks

Thanks for the suggestion (and the welcome). That would seem to have the added benefit of removing some weight from the sills (which are probably rotted anyway). Is anyone around here familiar with foundation styles/methods from the mid-19th century?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: