Question on shed joists

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  #1  
Old 10-22-04, 02:41 PM
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Question on shed joists

I'm building a small shed with a cement block foundation and in the article they say to double up the front and rear joists.

When placing the first front and rear joists on the blocks, how far inboard should I place the joists from the outside edge of the blocks? Reason I ask is that if I double up on the joists it seems like you would want the second joist to also rest on the block and in the picture below it almost looks like they didn't leave enough room.

This shed is going in between my house and a fence which limits the width to 4'. I haven't decided the length yet but I'll probably want to go longer than the longest available 2x6. Of course no matter what I will have joist support at 8' intervals. If I go longer than the longest 2x6 can I splice them on top of a block? I'm assuming there is some type of metal splice available and I can stagger the joints for the outboard joist.


I'm probably pushing the limits for this type of construction but it won't be holding anything particularly heavy, just odds and ends. Here are some pics of the construction style I'm following:

http://popularmechanics.com/home_imp...d/index3.phtml

This OK for what I'm proposing?

Thanks
 

Last edited by AlexH; 10-22-04 at 02:52 PM.
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  #2  
Old 10-22-04, 09:46 PM
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Alex,

For all practical purposes, the longest 2X6 (or anything else in dimensional lumber) that you are going to find is going to be 20'. If you are doubling the rim joists, then splicing them over a pier block, or some other means of support, won't be a problem. Since you are doubling them, put the splice of the inner joist over one block, and the splice of the outter over a different block. (Run a full 20' from the south end for the inner joist, and the short one to the north end, and for the outter joist, run the full 20' from the north end, and the short one the rest of the way to the south end. The joint of the inner joist occurs over one block, and the splice of the outter occurs over a different block.)

Your siding will probably be hanging down below the rim joists -- place the outter joist FLUSH with the outside of your support block.
 
  #3  
Old 11-02-04, 03:28 AM
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Framing Shed

This thread has been moved from Shed Forum to Framing Forum for discussion.
 
  #4  
Old 11-02-04, 05:03 AM
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Originally Posted by AlexH
I'm building a small shed with a cement block foundation and in the article they say to double up the front and rear joists.
This is a recommended practice for carrying wall and roof loads and should also be implemented at the end walls.

Originally Posted by AlexH
When placing the first front and rear joists on the blocks, how far inboard should I place the joists from the outside edge of the blocks?
1.5", so that the outside edge of the doubler will be even with the outside edge of the block. This can also be adjusted to allow for any backer boards used for siding.

Originally Posted by AlexH
I'll probably want to go longer than the longest available 2x6.
To maintain the integrity of the doubled rim joist, stagger the lengths and splice over your bearing points. A gusset plate should not be necessary.

Originally Posted by AlexH
Of course no matter what I will have joist support at 8' intervals.
It appears that your bearing points, in the photo, are closer to 5'.

Originally Posted by AlexH
I'm probably pushing the limits for this type of construction but it won't be holding anything particularly heavy, just odds and ends.
Just a note. In occupied residential construction, when a building exceeds three times its width, in length, a sheathed wall is required.
 
  #5  
Old 11-06-04, 12:52 PM
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I'll just add that, if you try to span 8' with a 2x6, it's going to sag in the middle. If it's doubled up, you might be ok, but I still wouldn't go 8'. On a single 2x6, I wouldn't try to span more than 4' without a support, even less if it's going to have any load on it. Either that, or use a larger joist.
 
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