Kitchen remodel soffit framing

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Old 12-11-04, 09:17 PM
riverbend
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Kitchen remodel soffit framing

Looking for advice on how to construct a soffit like the one shown above the cabinets in the photo at

http://www.kraftmaid.com/rooms/index...oomsceneid=337

The room already has 10 foot ceilings and is sheetrocked. Any ideas?
 
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Old 12-12-04, 07:30 AM
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This duplicate post was answered in Carpentry and Woodworking.
 
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Old 12-12-04, 07:31 AM
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Welcome to the forums riverbend. This would have been much easier to do before the room was rocked, but this can still be done w/o too much trouble. Main thing is to consider all the pertinent measurements prior to beginning this project. Height of appliances, namely the fridge, cabinet level, and don't forget to include the thickness of the sheetrock that will cover the soffit with doing your calculations.

The framing is basic, 2"x4" construction, no load there so it could even be framed with 2"x2"s if you wished. Hope that helps out, post back if you still have additional questions or need further direction.
 
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Old 12-12-04, 07:11 PM
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Riverbend,

Indeed your post was duplicated & band width or disk space on the servers is limited, I'm literate in computer & that's about it. In the future, please try not to duplicate your post.

I'll answer your PM here, for the benefit of all. You asked about the structure sagging since it was only attached to the wall. I don't think that the previous poster intended for you to only anchor the soffit framing to the wall only, It would need to be anchored to the ceiling joists as well.

Now my understanding from your PM is that this space formerly was a living rm, which is being remodeled into a kitchen space. My first thought, if possibly this a situation where you are subdividing an existing single family home into a duplex or apt. deal, might think about leaving the space above the cabinets open for additional storage space, or incorporating additional built-in cabinet space into the soffit.

That being said, I would rough frame the soffit in two sections on the ground, then install them in this situation. Since the space is already drywalled in, you'll need to locate both the wall studs and the ceiling joists in order to properly anchor the soffit in. As long as the ceiling joists aren't running parallel to the wall on which the soffit is to be anchored, this is a piece of cake. As I said before, build the soffit in two sections, on the floor. 2"x2" will work fine, and reduce the weight. Locate and mark the stud & joist locations, snap lines on the wall & ceiling with a chalkline so the soffit will be square and plumb when installed. You can anchor this to the existing wall & ceiling over the existing drywall, just be sure to use a long enough fastener (I'd recommend using screws or an airnailer) so that it goes thru the new framing, old drywall, & into the stud a good 1/2" to 5/8". Attach the vertical secion first to the ceiling & then attach the horizontal section to the wall and attach to every stud or joist.

Be sure to take into consideration the things I mentioned in my previous post & let us know if you need more help and how the project turns out.
 
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Old 12-12-04, 08:12 PM
riverbend
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Kitchen remodel and soffit framing

It was pointed out to me today that I'm actually building a ledge and not a soffit. Not too good with the terminology but then we are DIYers. In the pic the "ledge" doesn't attach to the ceiling and this is what I'm wanting to do. It won't be structural, it will just support pot or recessed lights and maybe some decorative accessories. And the cabinets below it may help support it.
 
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Old 12-16-04, 05:51 PM
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Sorry lost track of this thread for a couple of days. OK looking at the picture again, I see the ledge you're referring to, in that case the initial suggestion you got in the woodworking forum is a pretty good way to go. If you use 2"x4"s framed into squares on edge and 1/2" drywall, you'll end up with a 4" high ledge, if you wanted the ledge to be thicker you could use 2"x6"s instead. HTH
 
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