Framing a bath nook or alcove.


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Old 01-17-05, 07:34 AM
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Framing a bath nook or alcove.

I'm doing a complete bath gut and remodel for the first time. Reading everything I can get my hands on, asking people for advice, etc. One thing I can't find in any do-it-yourself books is how to frame and prep a nook or built-in in a wall for something like a shower area.

I understand the basic framing is similar to framing a hole for a built-in medicine cabinet or such, but if I'm going to actually just tile the nook (rather than buy something pre-made to slip in), do I need to build some sort of plywood box (essentially a tiny cabinet) to put in the framed hole to act as a substrate for the backerboard and tile?

Just trying to figure out once I have framed the opening what I attach the backerboard to and stuff. I'm guessing I would line the opening with whatever prep materials I would put on the rest of the wall prior to tiling, but with just the framing that leaves no "back" to the nook. You're just looking at the back of the sheetrock of the room on the other side of the wall.

Thanks for any insight,

Chris
 
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Old 01-17-05, 08:11 AM
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Decide where you want the nook and add blocking to the top and bottom of the nook between the studs Add any framing you need to narrow the width as needed. If it's in a shower, I like to slightly pitch the bottom blocking. Then add a piece of cemtn board to the back, no need to fasten it, then istall backer on the sides, top and bottom, with about a 1/8" gap between fro thinsetting and taping. The backer lining the sides will hold the back piece in place. Once done, if it's in a wet area, you will wnat to waterproof the nook with a roll on water proofing membrane such as Redguard or blue 92 before setting your tile.

Maybe move this to the tile forum where people can search tile threads for future reference.
 
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Old 01-17-05, 10:07 AM
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Just to clarify

Originally Posted by Tilebri
Then add a piece of cemtn board to the back, no need to fasten it, then istall backer on the sides, top and bottom, with about a 1/8" gap between fro thinsetting and taping. The backer lining the sides will hold the back piece in place.
So the piece of cement board added in the back just gets pushed all the way into the framed hole so that it's backside is up against the back of the wall into the other room?

Also, just to clarify, when you say cement board and backer board you're meaning the same thing, right?
 
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Old 01-17-05, 11:47 AM
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Cement board, backer board, backer, cbu, all refering to the same stuff. No need to affix the backer to the sheetrock of the opposite wall. The cement board on the sides and the backer board top and bottom inside the niche will hold the back piece in place. Once the seams are all thinsetted and taped, the back piece is going nowhere. Remember to water proof the niche inside the entire niche and for about 6" outside the niche by using a roll on water proofing membrane on the cbu. The water proof membrane is needed because otherwise water will wick through the cement board and get into your blocking and the sheetrock of the opposite wall. Because the niche penetrates the plane of the shower wall, you will not be able to get the moisture barrier you install on the studs into the cavity of the niche. Redguard will solve that problem and prevent any water infiltration. Cement baords are not waterproof, so that is why the 6 mil poly or 15 lb roofing felt is installed over the studs and drip edge of the tub or shower prior to the cement board.
 
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Old 02-02-05, 10:51 PM
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Red face Book to check out...

There is a book called "Bathroom Remodeling" in the Black and Decker Home Improvement Library series that has great information on framing an alcove. I checked it out from our local library. They probably have it at Home Depot, too. You can get lots of great advice in this forum, of course, but the pictures in the book are worth a thousand words. Hope it helps!
 
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Old 02-03-05, 07:29 AM
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Jill,

Checking How-to books out of the local library is a great suggestion, libraries are free And free is always the best price!
 
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Old 02-12-05, 07:02 AM
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I'll try it again

I'm going to check that book out again for sure. I could have sworn that book was one that I've had several times already, but I don't know how I missed the bath nook part.

Thanks for the tip.
 
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Old 02-12-05, 09:27 PM
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Just to Clarify

My wording probably is to blame. I checked out the Bathroom Remodeling book again today from the library and still didn't see anything about framing the kind of nook or alcove I was really meaning. Then I saw the section about framing an alcove such as a tub would be put in.

In hindsight I probably shouldn't have used the word "alcove" since what I really was meaning was something much smaller. I'm just talking about a small hole in the wall for a shampoo bottle or soap - something like that. I see all kinds of neat built-ins in idea books, tiled nooks in the showers, mirrors set into the wall, built in shelves that seem to be finished with sheetrock and painted as the wall itself.

But it's these kinds of details that I can't seem to find in any do it yourself book. How to do the upscale touches to a room? I'm sure they aren't terribly much harder than framing a partition wall, but books I've seen just don't cover things like that. The picture books are all over the place that show the really cool modern, European stylings, but to find any resource that tells me how to do it is pretty much impossible. And unless a person has deep pockets, getting the Euro look seems to be out of the question as far as buying pre-made stuff.

Anyway, the first reply to my question pretty much answered the question as far as a "nook" that I was really meaning. "Alcove" really does refer to something much larger, and is correctly covered in that Black and Decker book.
 
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Old 02-12-05, 10:56 PM
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My bad... I just re-read your post and see I misread it... But I could have sworn the book I mentioned had something like that in there. I am planning to build a similiar thing in my kitchen, and now I can't the informationa anywhere in any of the books I read... hmmmmmmm... Good luck with your project!
 
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Old 02-16-05, 03:58 AM
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OK, then what's next, the shower nook is complete, so would you like to move onto built in shelves or mirrors? I'm waiting
 
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Old 03-15-05, 12:13 PM
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Shower shelf & mirror

I definitely am interested in a shower shelf. I don't mean one that you can sit on, i mean one that would separate the niche into a small soap bar size hole from the larger shampoo bottle size above it. All part of one niche, just a shelf for the shampoo to sit on. (The wife has a lot of shampoos.)

By the way, how do you put on handles so they attach to studs but remain waterproof?
 
 

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