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Sistering Floor Joists


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11-20-01, 06:25 AM   #1  
Sump pump

I have new home construction. I have never had a sump pump in the past and am uncertain as to when it should work and what it should sound like. I have been in my new home for 5 months and I have yet to hear this pump work. I have put three buckets of water into the well and nothing happens. The water does not leave the well. Could it be that the builder never hooked this up properly?

 
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02-09-05, 01:24 PM   #2  
Sistering Floor Joists

My house is a rancher with full basement, built in 1960 or so. The subflooring is t&g 1x6 placed at a 45-degree angle. The joists are 2x8, 16" o.c., with a span of about 13 feet each direction from the center beam.

There is a noticeable "bounce" in the floors I'd like to fix, and I understand that sistering the joists might do that. What exactly is involved in this process?

 
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02-10-05, 07:29 AM   #3  
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Last edited by kuhurdler; 02-04-07 at 02:29 PM.
 
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02-11-05, 07:38 AM   #4  
Thanks. Just the information I was looking for.

 
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08-27-06, 10:04 AM   #5  
Support a floor without access to joists

Finished attic bedrooms have spongy floors similar to described below. Would like to firm up for use by teenagers without feeling like they're coming through the ceiling below. Without access from finished bedrooms below, would heavy (3/4") plywood or OSB (out to the attic knee walls) glued and screwed into existing joists help or exacerbate the problem due to additional weight on the floor?

 
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