need post or frame minimum tolerances

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  #1  
Old 03-18-05, 10:41 PM
Jimco4352
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Question need post or frame minimum tolerances

Hello-
I am building a 16'x20' addition on the back of my home, i am doing some building assuming my plans will be approved, i have put down 1' wide x 2' tall footings around the perimeter and i want to design the lower level to hold a room above it. i am trying my best to have the lower room framed around the perimeter only. no posts in the (middle area of the lower room), my question is: would it be better to run my beams the 16' away from the existing building direction with 5 - 4x10x (at least 16 feet long?) and would this be sufficient for most building codes? i also am trying to decide if framing a wall below the supporting beams will be stronger than using posts and shearing them.
any help is greatly appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-19-05, 07:33 AM
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As I read it, you want to run 5, 4"x10"x16' beams, 4' apart for 20'.

I'm no expert, but I'd say that wouldn't be enough. Even if you filled in the 4' with 2x10's, a 2x10 can't span 16' unsupported.

I'd look into the laminated I beams, you can span a good distance with those, and you can even get them with knockouts for electrical and plumbing.
 
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Old 03-19-05, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Jimco4352
Hello-
I am building a 16'x20' addition on the back of my home, i am doing some building assuming my plans will be approved, i have put down 1' wide x 2' tall footings around the perimeter and i want to design the lower level to hold a room above it. i am trying my best to have the lower room framed around the perimeter only. no posts in the (middle area of the lower room), my question is: would it be better to run my beams the 16' away from the existing building direction with 5 - 4x10x (at least 16 feet long?) and would this be sufficient for most building codes? i also am trying to decide if framing a wall below the supporting beams will be stronger than using posts and shearing them.
any help is greatly appreciated.
Be careful how much work you do before you get the permit. You generally need to have inspection at certain stages - one of those is after the footings have been dug and steel is in place. This is before concrete is poured! Another inspection is after the framing is up - they check nailing, etc - and another is for plumbing and electrical.

As far as the framing is concerned, 2x12's at 16" o.c. will handle the 16' span. They will need to have solid bridging (2x12 blocks) at mid span.
 
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Old 03-19-05, 08:15 AM
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Wink

Check code first before you do anything.

As far as the framing is concerned, 2x12's at 16" o.c. will handle the 16' span. They will need to have solid bridging (2x12 blocks) at mid span.
Im with JOE but Id add 2 rows of blocks it helps. 1/3 in from each side.

ED
 
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Old 03-19-05, 09:33 AM
Jimco4352
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Thumbs up 'Minimum tolerances continued'

thanks alot for the replies- i have purchased several books and gone to several websites and not felt as informed as i am here.

so- assumimg 2x12's will handle the load at a 16 foot span, the wall framing to support this can be done with 2"x4" framing boards?

I was going to use 2x6's to frame the lower area, with the large footings the wall height would be around 6'. the lower area will not be a room, (more of a storage area).

if i were to use 4"x10" x 16 foot header beams would i have more strength?
I can block the spans with 2x10's. i want to fault in the over engineering rather than the under for obvious reasons.

I have talked with the building dept in my area and have done everything to comply with the footing and foundation codes and took pictures of the steel in the footings. this will be a legal addition, or it will just turn out to be a very strong backyard deck :-).

I tip my hat to the responders here, you opinions are very valueable to me at this time, thank you!
 
  #6  
Old 03-19-05, 07:35 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
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Jim

You mentioned you sopke with your building dept people about your footings, but did you visit with them about the beans and wall framing you want to do.
They will have the final say so on how it will be constructed. I would ask them the questions you asked us and see what they say. Good Luck
 
  #7  
Old 03-19-05, 08:05 PM
Jimco4352
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Cool

thanks Jack- i am thinking of using posts in the center at this point, the building inspector in my town was helpful, he just suggested i have it engineered, i do not think it is that complicated. i just received a couple of brochures today from the simpson strongtie company, they have shear wall specs in the catologs, there must be a simple standard, i will find it. it is simply a 16 feet long by 20 feet wide rectangle, that i want to place a addition of my bedroom on. i can use 2x12s at 16" centers with bridging at 4 feet and be fine. how i frame the walls below has been my only question, what will hold it without any problems? do i need 4x10 headers or can this 4x12x16 frame sit directly on top of framed walls below as long as the doorways have adequet support? i already know how to anchor everything as i have years of experience in plumbing and a/c work.

you all are the best, thanks,
Jim
 
  #8  
Old 03-20-05, 02:52 AM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
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Jim

I would use 16' 2x12's, 16" on center. I would frame my peremiter walls with 2x6's. 2x4's would work, but I would still use the 2x6's. You could put a beam under the 2x12's if you like, but it would not be necessary. Remember
that after you get your floor joists in place, to put a kicker under the ends of each side under the ends of the joists. This is usually just a 2x4. Put it right up against the joist hangers. Sounds like your on the right track. Good Luck
 
  #9  
Old 03-20-05, 10:43 AM
Jimco4352
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Smile Thanks Jack!


I think I could have been better at decribing the situation, and the real question i was trying to get answered, But Jack got it right, i was most concerned about the lower wall framing and the best way to design it so the building dept. would not make me re-do my plans again, the only problem with the 2x12's for me is the 4 to 6 inches i will need to offset in the room below
but since i will be using the area below for mostly non living space i am not worried about the ceiling hieght, i have dug down as far as i can and i do not want to step up into the bedroom addition, so i will just find happiness with the hand i have dealt myself. i cannot say enough about how good it is to have this place to ask questions that seem simple but are also extremely important. i am very happy i found this site, Thanks all!
 
  #10  
Old 03-20-05, 10:55 AM
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Jim

Your Very Welcome.
 
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