Garage header question

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  #1  
Old 08-01-05, 01:38 PM
rlcoker
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Garage header question

I need more height in my garage door. It is a 9' wide door under a gable roof. There is brick veneer with an arch bottom that at the top of the arch is about 9" from the bottom of the opening. Emtpy attic is on top of the garage. The header is composed of a sandwich of two 2x6s side to side on top of each other next to 1/2' osb next to another pair of 2x6s next to another 1/2 osb. I would like to cut an arc to raise the central height of the opening. At the center, this would come up to the top row of 2x6s, cutting thru the bottom row. Would the single row of 2x6s be enough for a header? I could screw a 3/16th" x 6" x 10' steel plate across the remaining header. Would this be enough or worthwhile? Opinions and suggestions are apreciated. Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 08-01-05, 03:43 PM
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Do the ceiling joists run perpendicular to the garage door wall, or parallel to it?

I'd remove the sheetrock above your header clear to the ceiling to expose all the framing, remove the old headers completely, along with any cripples above the header. Then install a new full length header right up against the top plate that is as wide as possible- from the top plate to the top of the arch you plan on cutting out. Sandwich OSB between the header as needed to get the right width, but allow yourself 1/2" on each side so that you can hang a sheet of OSB down past the header on each side, and cut your arch out of that.
 
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Old 08-01-05, 03:55 PM
rlcoker
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Thanks, XSleeper, the joists are perpendicular to the header.
 
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Old 08-01-05, 04:56 PM
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Since the joists are perpendicular, and the header is under a gable end, the majority of the weight on this header will be the weight of the header itself, the wall framing above it, and ceiling weight- dead load. Any weight you put in the attic in the future should also be taken into consideration- live load. Therefore the size of this header should actually be engineered- calculated in order to be able to handle that load.

Since I'm not an engineer, I can't give you that information, but it's likely that you can't go wrong with a 2x12 header. a 2x10 header might be the minimum you would consider without getting an engineer's opinion. a 2x8 header might be pushing its structrual limits.
 
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Old 08-01-05, 06:45 PM
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Use my header guide to framing something...

If you think you need a 2x6 use a 2x8, a 2x8 use a 2x10, a 2x10 use a 2x12. Going a bit over what you need is far better then cutting it too close.
 
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Old 08-01-05, 07:37 PM
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We must have gone to the same school, Hellrazor.

Unfortunately, my good ol dad's method was just the opposite. If he should have been using a 2x8, he'd use a 2x6. Instead of 2x6's, 2x4. That explains why his roof and ceiling are sagging.
 
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