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Speed bump on floors


twinklegura's Avatar
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08-01-05, 08:58 PM   #1  
twinklegura
Speed bump on floors

Almost every room in my house have these "speed bumps". They literally popped up overnight one day. Our mobile home had some previous water damage we were not aware of and had a major storm that caused the rain water to flow right under our house. This caused the floors to make speed bumps. Now we have noticed a few places where the floors seem to give if you step on it. We have had a horrible time trying to find someone to even give us an estimate on how much it will cost to fix it. If we do this ourselves, is this relatively simple or should we keep looking for help?

 
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Adago2's Avatar
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08-02-05, 04:18 AM   #2  
"speed bumps"

It sounds like you floors have suffered moisture infiltration and are decomposing.
This could be caused by leakage and / or lack of ventilation in the under skirt.
The "speed bumps" are where the floor joist are. The rest of the non supported areas are dipping.
Replacing the floor deck in not fun but can be done.
The problem is the integrity of the support where the walls meet the floor deck.
This can be inspected by either removing a piece of siding at the bottom plate or cutting an inspection hole in the floor along the wall and see how soft the decking is under the plate.
Good Luck!!

 
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08-02-05, 06:00 AM   #3  
If the water damage to the particle board is through out the entire trailer it may be easiest to do a room at a time. Most mobile home floors are 5/8" thick. It is likely that it will be hard to measure for sure as particle board swells went it gets good and wet and then a little later it gets soft and crumbles. As Adago2 noted the floors could be rotten under the wall framing. It is an agravating job but you can chisel it out and slide the new plywood under the sole plate. You also will likely find it necessarry to add short pieces of floor joist to assist in having something to nail the plywood to. Labor would be the biggest expense in replacing the floor and it isn't all that complicated but it does take a lot of sweat equity. Wish you luck

 
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08-02-05, 07:59 PM   #4  
twinklegura
Speed bumps

Thanks so much for the advice! =) My husband and I have decided to start buying a sheet of plywood a week (I get paid weekly) and start building up a supply so we will have enough to get started. What would be a good type of plywood to get? I DEFINETLY don't want to deal with plywood again. Espcially if it could happen again. Is this a project that would be expensive?

Thanks again!

 
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08-03-05, 06:30 AM   #5  
Regular plywood would be the best choice. OSB would be acceptable. Do not use particle board, that is what most trailers are built with and what always fails when subjected to water. Plywood like all lumber these days is subject to daily price changes.

 
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08-17-05, 02:11 PM   #6  
kcohick
Speed Bump on Floors

would a weak floor from water be the only reason for this issue

 
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08-17-05, 05:26 PM   #7  
The floor joists can suffer water or termite damage. Particle board damage is caused by water over 90% of the time.

 
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08-18-05, 06:08 AM   #8  
Repair the problem before repairing the result!

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"It sounds like you floors have suffered moisture infiltration and are decomposing.
This could be caused by leakage and / or lack of ventilation in the under skirt."
Make sure there is enough ventilation to allow evaporation of moisture from ground water and condensation. This is a guess but I believe it to be the problem.

Also, check for leakage from exterior and/or plumbing.

 
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