How to frame this wall (oblique wall)


  #1  
Old 11-18-05, 02:48 PM
hhsieh
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How to frame this wall (oblique wall)

I'm trying to frame some 45deg walls for my shower stall (see pictures)

1) actual design

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y26...islometric.jpg

2) footprint (top view)

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y26...ubhub/bth2.jpg

I was wondering how professionals frame the corners at Location A (135-deg inside-angle new wall to new wall) and at Location B (45-deg angle new wall to existing wall). How should the vertical studs be oriented to provide good wall-to-wall attachment (and good support for wall boards)? Does anyone knows online sites discussing framing regarding these unusual configurations?

Again, I'm not looking for untested ideas. I'm looking for typical methods used by professionals.

Thanks for your help!

Hsieh
 
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Old 11-18-05, 03:59 PM
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Here's how I would frame it. http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/thexsl...nm=7229scd.jpg


Keep in mind there is always more than one way to do things. It's nice to have backing for outside corner bead, and also solid backing in the inside corners. Nailing the corners together will hopefully help prevent drywall cracks.

I'm not a professional framer, but I do quite a bit of remodelling. Not sure, but I don't think framers would use those details because it's too time consuming. They'd just leave everything much like you have it in your drawing, and assume that someone else would add the backing later, or else the corner bead would get glued on.
 
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Old 11-20-05, 07:42 PM
hhsieh
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Xsleeper,

Thanks for spending time dealing with my question. Judging from the lacking of responses, I value your suggestion very much. In fact, I think I will proceed with your outlined framing scheme.

Hsieh
 
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Old 11-20-05, 08:28 PM
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hhsieh:
Your comment about lack of responses is not take lightly by me. You just posted it late Friday. But never mind that. The framing is very very simple. You are looking at it backwards. For instance you are looking at a 135 degree angle. I look at it as an outside 45 degree angle. Very simple. Just tilt your saw to 45 degrees, rip your stud and nail it up. Done deal. The same for the other corner. This whole frame work is only about a 2 hour job for a framer. My bathroom crew does alot of these. They are easy, you just have to think outside the box. In other words just think backwards. Sleeper gave you a nice drawing to follow. I do it a little different, but it all works out the same. Good Luck
 
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Old 11-21-05, 11:38 AM
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I did some angled walls in my basement remodel and I did it the way Jack explained it. Use your circular saw and rip a 2x4 at a 45 degree angle (length wise) and then nail it on. Don't over think it...it is not structural, so it doesn't have to be pretty.
 
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Old 11-21-05, 12:19 PM
hhsieh
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Re: last 2 reply

Thanks for your information!

But I'm still not too clear: The picture shown below (link) is what I can understand from you for Location A.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y26...ubhub/bth3.jpg

The shaded area indicated material to be kept after 2 rips. However, I don't see how you get there by doing only a single rip. Or have I understood you correctly?!

Still not quite too sure about your implementation at Location B. Would you say your implementation is identical to that from Mr Xsleeper?

Hsieh
 
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Old 11-21-05, 03:18 PM
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hhsieh:
Just rip your 2x4 at a 45 degree angle. Then flip one side over so the two points are together. Nail these two pieces together. The point side is the inside angle point. Now just fill in with blocking with the the rest of the wall..
 
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Old 11-21-05, 03:27 PM
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I think that this is what they are referring to:

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/thexsl...e2.jpg&.src=ph

or maybe not? DOH!
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 11-21-05 at 03:39 PM.
  #9  
Old 11-22-05, 04:49 AM
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That's pretty close to what I was describing. Except, why do you show the 2x4 only 2 1/2" at it's longest point?? There is no need to cut it down. You can kept it at the full width of 4" (or 3 1/2").
 
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Old 11-22-05, 09:17 AM
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How to frame this wall (oblique wall)

The 2 1/2" length is dictated by the location of the full stud to the left of it. that stud must be at the inside corner to provide support for the inside sheet rock.

Dick
 
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Old 11-22-05, 09:45 AM
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But you can just throw in some blocking on the inside corner though. It will save you from having to the 2x4 the full lenght at 2 1/2".
 
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Old 11-22-05, 10:59 AM
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I see what em69 is saying... if the measurement in my drawing would have been 3 1/2" to the long point, it would just mean that the studs would each be 3/4" away from the inside corner, which is close enough for drywall! But it looks to me like you'd have a hard time connecting the tip of that 3 1/2" long point to the stud next to it, since it would only be touching at the tip.

I don't have it drawn quite right anyway, so forget my 2nd drawing. The only way it would work the way I have it drawn is if the stud on one side was centered on the inside corner, while the other one was about 1" away from the inside corner.

I guess that's why I prefer doing it the way I had it in that first link. It may be 2 pieces instead of one, but it seems stronger to me to have everything fit together. The studs can be cross nailed at the inside corner, and when you add the 2 pieces of blocking that are 22.5 degrees, 1 1/2" at the long point, you can also nail the outside corner together too. Hopefully it will keep that corner from bowing and it'll make the drywall finisher happy to have a straight corner.

Like I mentioned before, there's obviously several ways professionals might do it. Framers who are going for speed would do it one way, remodellers might do it another way, and then there's finish carpenters, and I won't even get into that. You can probably figure out which I am.
 
 

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