roughing in a door frame questions

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  #1  
Old 12-05-05, 09:53 AM
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roughing in a door frame questions

I am getting ready to finish my basement. I'm trying to determine my rough door openings for the bifold doors I'll be installing. From other things I've read a rule of thumb is to leave 2 inches both horizontal and vertical. If I'm installing a bifold that is 80"x30" I would have a rough opening of 82"x32". My questions are does this account for the carpet as well? Also is the 2" rule is you are going to wood trim the opening before hanging the door? I might just sheetrock the opening and not trim it. Does this change this?

Also, the times I've seen walls built the footer board is left in place in the door opening to only be cut out later. That is 1.5" itself. Do I account for that in the 82" opening? Just need to be straightened out a little as I've found a few pretty good items on it but nothing that addresses this specifically. Man I love the net
 
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  #2  
Old 12-05-05, 10:08 AM
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Hey Klutch.

Yes, the 2" would leave room for a wooden door jamb to be shimmed into the rough opening. The "finished" opening is what will be 30x80. So the inside of that wooden jamb would be 30x80. Generally, there is a small steel pivot shoe that is installed on the bottom hinge side of the door. If you're going to have carpet, you usually put a 1/2" shim underneath that pivot shoe so that it's resting on something solid (not the carpet), that way the pivot shoe isn't sunken way down into the carpet and your door won't be in danger of dragging on the carpet. You'd want to add this 1/2" to the height of your finished and rough openings.

If you plan on drywalling the opening and just having cornerbead, you have to make the rough opening perfectly plumb and square, and exactly the same dimension at the top as at the bottom. If you're putting 1/2" drywall on each side, it will actually be about 5/8" by the time the corner bead gets filled. So if you want to drywall the opening, your R.O. would need to be exactly 31 1/4" x 81 1/8" (5/8" on each side plus the 1/2" for the pivot shoe shim.) It's better for the rough opening to be a little too tall than a little too short, so it could even be 81 1/2" tall and you'd be okay.

You're measurements are pulled from the floor, not from the top of the sill plate, regardless of whether it's there or not. Even if it's there, imagine it's not because it will get cut out later.
 
  #3  
Old 12-05-05, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
Hey Klutch.

Yes, the 2" would leave room for a wooden door jamb to be shimmed into the rough opening. The "finished" opening is what will be 30x80. So the inside of that wooden jamb would be 30x80. Generally, there is a small steel pivot shoe that is installed on the bottom hinge side of the door. If you're going to have carpet, you usually put a 1/2" shim underneath that pivot shoe so that it's resting on something solid (not the carpet), that way the pivot shoe isn't sunken way down into the carpet and your door won't be in danger of dragging on the carpet. You'd want to add this 1/2" to the height of your finished and rough openings.

If you plan on drywalling the opening and just having cornerbead, you have to make the rough opening perfectly plumb and square, and exactly the same dimension at the top as at the bottom. If you're putting 1/2" drywall on each side, it will actually be about 5/8" by the time the corner bead gets filled. So if you want to drywall the opening, your R.O. would need to be exactly 31 1/4" x 81 1/8" (5/8" on each side plus the 1/2" for the pivot shoe shim.) It's better for the rough opening to be a little too tall than a little too short, so it could even be 81 1/2" tall and you'd be okay.

You're measurements are pulled from the floor, not from the top of the sill plate, regardless of whether it's there or not. Even if it's there, imagine it's not because it will get cut out later.

Thanks X-sleeper, that answers my questions pretty well. I imagine the footer board (sill plate) has caught a lot of newbs in the past.
 
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Old 12-06-05, 04:50 PM
drowell
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One more note

Also - when building the header for the bi-fold doors make sure that the ceiling and floor are the same measurements at the start and end. I assumed that they were the same distance at my house and now have a small gap on one side and a large gap on the other.

It would have been better to split the large gap into an adjustment to the header and the gap underneath the bi-fold door.
 
  #5  
Old 12-10-05, 09:32 PM
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Hey XSleeper, if I do the wooden jamb and have a 30"x80" door would I leave an opening 32"x81.5"(from the floor)?

I figure that gives me an inch on each side one inch for the top and half an inch for the pivot shoe shim. Should I do 32x82 just to make sure?

Do places sell the premade door jamb with smooth sides? I've only ever seem prehung doors or do I make the jamb myself?
 

Last edited by Klutch; 12-11-05 at 06:13 AM.
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Old 12-27-05, 07:03 PM
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Bump.......
 
  #7  
Old 12-28-05, 10:23 AM
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OOOpps, sorry Klutch! I was gone on a cruise for a week and missed your post!

Yes, a rough opening of 32x82 would probably work best, because the jamb you build for the bifold will measure 31 1/2 x 81 5/8 outside to outside and will be 30 x 81 inside to inside. This will give you about 1/4" on the outside of the jamb which will be just right to shim it in place in the rough opening.

You'll probably purchase jamb material from a big box store. If your wall is 2x4, with drywall on each side, you'll want a standard 4 9/16" jamb. If your walls are 2x6, with drywall on each side, you'll want a standard 6 9/16" jamb. If you have some other configuration where the wall thickness is not standard, you might be better off buying a solid 1x6, rip it to width and make your own jamb.

Stores usually carry several kinds of jambs- they keep them in the millwork/trim department along with the casing and such. The majority of them will be particle board core with a wood veneer, such as Birch, Pine, Oak, or imitation mahogany. If your woodwork will be painted, I'd suggest you get preprimed jambs, which are usually made of MDF.

If you end up purchasing the premade jambs, you will need 2 sides and a top. The sides will be about 81 5/8" long, and they come with a rabbet on one end. Then you'll buy a 37" long head piece (they may have different lengths of head pieces, just get one that is long enough and cut it down to about 30 3/4".) You'll nail the side jambs onto the head piece and that will be your jamb for the bifold. You'll shim it into the rough opening until it is plumb and level, ensuring that the bottom of the legs remain the same width at the bottom and middle as it is at the top (30").
 
  #8  
Old 01-02-06, 01:00 PM
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One more thing to think about if you decide to sheetrock the opening in stead of installing a doorjamb. Many (maybe all) pivot shoes fasten to the inside of the opening. If this is the case, the baseboard trim may not be square enough and/or sturdy enough to properly align and/or support the pivot shoe. Also, the baseboard will need to be considered when calculating the RO. IMO installing jamb stock is easier, and will spare you a headache later.
Good Luck.
 
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