LvL beam above the joists


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Old 12-10-05, 06:34 PM
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LvL beam above the joists

I am removing a load bearing wall and using a LvL beam 14''x5.25x18 to support the joists. Instead of cutting the joists and using hangers to tie into the beam, can i place the beam on top of the joists and suspend the joists from the beam using a type of strap on either side of each joist?
 
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Old 12-11-05, 07:34 AM
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I hope you mean the beam goes under the joists..
 
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Old 12-11-05, 08:07 AM
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no, I want to place the beam on top of the joists, support both ends of the beam and connect the joists to the beam using a type of hanger bracket. I want to know if anyone seen this before and if so what type of brackets work best?
 
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Old 12-11-05, 01:38 PM
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Nothing i am aware of will allow you to do that. Consult an engineer.
 
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Old 12-11-05, 02:15 PM
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It would really surprise me if Simpson didn't have SOME sort of tie that could handle this, it can't be too uncommon, especially in post and beam construction...

Edit: well, to my surprise, looks like they don't! Looks like trimming the joists is about the only thing you can do.
 
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Old 12-11-05, 03:57 PM
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How large are your joists? You *might* be able to get away with using an I-joist hanger, as they come very long- 16" or 18", and I don't believe require solid end blocking, as demonstrated by their Steel I-beam illustration. And so could possible mount to your LVL and extend down low enough to support your joists. Since your joists would be carrying far less load than the I-joists they're are designed for, strength shouldn't be an issue so I wouldn't think it would matter that you can't use all the nail holes.

http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...-ITTM_SCL.html
http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/THAI.html
 
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Old 12-11-05, 04:54 PM
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Thanks for the info. I talked to an engineer and he has never seen it done like this but it would still work with the right hanger.
 
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Old 12-11-05, 04:54 PM
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Thanks for the info. I talked to an engineer and he has never seen it done like this but it would still work with the right hanger.
 
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Old 12-12-05, 06:36 AM
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It won't be easy

to find a ready made product that will restrain the lateral force on the hanger. I have designed thousands of floors and never once had this request
 
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Old 12-12-05, 11:34 AM
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It is possible to support the joists as you propose. There are some commercially available adjustable truss hangers on the market that may work, depending on the depth of your joists. You would want to make sure that the nails used to attach the hangers to the header are located in the upper half of the header. It would also be advisable to provide wood blocking between the joists, below the new header. It is an unorthodox connection, and thus should be designed by a structural engineer, in my opinion.
 
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Old 12-12-05, 01:01 PM
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Thanks again for your opinions. I figured that someone has either done this or seen it before.
 
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Old 12-26-05, 07:53 AM
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I've done it, and it worked for me. It was only supporting 2x6 ceiling joists and drywall. The strapps were ( I cant remember what they were called) twisted, and I put 2 on each joist and then blocking. So far no movement or cracks in the drywall. I would not suggest this for anything more than a drywall ceiling, and dont use screw for the straps.
 
 

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