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Ok, 2 framing questions that have been worrying me

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  #1  
Old 12-25-05, 06:05 PM
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Ok, 2 framing questions that have been worrying me

I'm just about to start on finishing my basement and have 3 framing questions that have me a little freaked out. I'm afraid if I start them wrong I'll have a nightmare trying to sheetrock.

1. How do you deal with corners on the framing. Is there a way to measure them so that you can be sure when done you will have enough space for your sheetrock? I've read that you have your end of the wall stud, you place 12" or so 2x4 spacers and then another stud, then you nail the adjoining wall to the end stud and spacers. Correct?

2. How far apart are the first 2 studs of the wall so your sheetrock lands on 16" OC throughout?

3. I have some damned long walls. If I have to build 2 seperate walls for one run how do I deal with that? Do I leave over hang on the last wall of the bottom and top plates and then leave overhang on the second wall all so that the studs land with 16" OC and then connect the walls with a 12" board on top and bottom?
 
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  #2  
Old 12-25-05, 07:20 PM
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There are several "corners" in framing.
The one you described, a mormon corner, which is an "L" made of two studs with a 3-1/2" dimension at one leg and an 5" dimension at the other. Another is the "boxed" or california corner, which is two studs side by side with scraps and cut-offs 2x4 nailed between them with an 3-1/2" dimension at one side and an 4-1/2" dimension on the other.
Both will allow for backing for wall material.
Where there is a wall in a perpendicular intersection to a wall, a "U" made from three studs is commonly used.
Your stud layout begins 3-1/2" in from the end of this corner with the center of the first stud beyond the corner falling at 20-1/4" from the end of the wall, or 16-3/4" from the inside of the 3-1/2" intersecting framing.(If you are using 2x4's).
At the 48" layout, that becomes the center of the stud and the layout restarts from there.
 
  #3  
Old 12-25-05, 08:04 PM
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If dealing with wood start your second stud 3 1/2" from the 1st. then pulling from the end of the second stud your measurement should be 24 5/8". this will allow you to break on the center of your 3rd stud. If you pull only 24" you will have to cut off 5/8" to hit center of your stud.
Also I would go with steel. It is easier than wood. You don't work half as hard and you get twice the amount of work done. If you can build with wood you can do steel. with that in mind, there is also a corner called a slider. This does not require a 3 stud corner. Whereever you start you framing pull 24 5/8" to hit center and then 24's from the second stud. When you star the wall that makes your corner. do not screw off the stud that will butt up to your previous framed wall, this allows you to move the stud to place in the sheetrock. Then once the board is in place, slide the stud tightly to the rock, and screw it off to the track top and bottom. For extra support toe nailit to the rock. Using steel also allows you to build where the wall goes instead of building on the floor and standing up, and eleminates having to build 2 or more sections, you just shoot your track on the floor the entire legnth of the wall, and the same on the top track, then fill in with studs. It's that easy. If I can teach my wife how to do it with no material, just telling her how it's done, and she can understand anyone can do it. And if you think it is too hard, stores like Lowes and H.D, do give classes. Believe me it is SIMPLE, easier than wood. Hope this helps and good luck
 
  #4  
Old 12-25-05, 08:40 PM
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I tried looking at Lowes' website for pricing on steel studs. Anyone know offhand approx what 8' studs run?
 

Last edited by mattison; 12-26-05 at 04:51 AM. Reason: No need to quote entire post above.
  #5  
Old 12-25-05, 10:29 PM
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It varies by area.Also, use a concrete sealer under the bottom trac, and its a good idea if your framiong at 24oc to use 5/8" board.
 

Last edited by mattison; 12-26-05 at 04:52 AM. Reason: No need to quote entire post above.
  #6  
Old 12-26-05, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Snoonyb
It varies by area.Also, use a concrete sealer under the bottom trac, and its a good idea if your framiong at 24oc to use 5/8" board.

How do you attach the bottom plate to the floor? Ramset?

I was just looking for a very general idea on the cost of the studs.
 
  #7  
Old 12-26-05, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Klutch
How do you attach the bottom plate to the floor? Ramset?.
Ramset (1" w/washers.) or tapcon, either is acceptable.

.[/QUOTE]I was just looking for a very general idea on the cost of the studs.[/QUOTE]
I assumed you would have called today, I would have checked their prices. I don't shop board or framing material from either HD or Lowes.
 
  #8  
Old 12-26-05, 06:01 PM
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Since this has somewhat turned into a steel framing thread, how are doorways dealt with? I assume you don't do them like you do with wood, cutting out the sole plate when done? Also, do you still use regular sheetrock screws?
 
  #9  
Old 12-27-05, 12:36 AM
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Here are a couple of tips for framing with steel studs.
Typical interior non-load bearing walls use "tincan" studs (.25ga) and a corresponding trac. The material is available in 1-5/8", 2-1/2", 3-5/8" etc.
Studs have a "soft" and "hard". Its common, though not a fixed practice, for the 1st stud to have the "soft" side facing the exterior wall and the "hard" side facing the "hard" side of the next stud, since you always frame to the "hard" side of the stud. When laying out the walls, you only mark the center of where the stud is placed.
I hang the board vertically, avoiding interior "butt" joints.
Also, do all your elec., blocking (you can use the trac as backing for the walls), fire stopping, ceiling framing and hang the lid first.
You can use the same dryloc that you painted your wall with, to seal the floors under the walls. It also makes the chalk lines stand out.
At doorways and cased openings, leave 1-1/2" more than the call-out dimension of the width of the door, and 1" for the height,"+" the thickness of the floor covering.
If you are using any of the variety of metal jambs and prehung doors available, then on each side of the door opening you use two studs, hard sides back to back, with the soft sides facing the opening. The header is formed from trac. For a 36" door, you'll need at least a 42" length of trac. With the "soft" side of the trac facing you, 2-1/2" in from either end cut both legs of the soft side, measure 37-1/2" and repeat. Bend both of these short pieces down and insert the header into the framed opening with the soft side up at the appropriate height (+ flooring thickness) and attach with flat head framing screws.
If you are using wood jambs, the hard side of the studs face the opening and you use "jamb screws", which are a narrow head screw to attach the jamb to the framing.
Since you are using "tincan" studs, both fine and coarse thread screws can be used. You just need to adjust the "set-depth" of your screw gun.

Visit a drywall supplier other than the local "bigbox" and invest in a couple of "framing" bits, you'll not regret it.
 
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