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framing a closet-unlevel floor


just some guy's Avatar
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01-10-06, 08:23 AM   #1  
framing a closet-unlevel floor

I'm framing a bedroom in my basement. I've framed in a 72" closet which will hold double bi-fold closet doors, and now I've realized that my basement floor is extremely unlevel. The left side of the closet is 5/8" lower than the right side, and I'm not sure how to proceed so that there is no noticable gap under one side of the closet doors.
This is the first room I've framed, so any advice is welcome.
Thanks.

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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01-10-06, 04:35 PM   #2  
The only real solution would be pouring self-levelling cement floor leveller in the low area, which might be a bigger project than you want, if the majority of the floor is getting lower and lower. If it's just a small dip in that area, the floor leveller would work fine.

For the exact product to use, you might try asking this question in either the Exterior > Brick, Masonry & Concrete forum or the Flooring > Ceramic Tile forum.

 
just some guy's Avatar
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01-10-06, 06:04 PM   #3  
thanks, XSleeper--I had thought about doing that, but the only problem is that the doorway is on the side of the room that the floor slopes downwards to, so I would have to continue the sloping all the way into the hallway, or face a drop off at the threshold.

One person suggested to me that I snap a chalkline across the doors at the bottom that is parallel to the floor and trim off the bottom so that it would be flush with the floor. Then another person told me it would probably splinter like crazy (it's a hollow, panelled door).

And maybe this post doesn't belong in this forum, since I don't know how else you would frame it other to make the header and king studs level and straight....might be more of a finish carpentry question....

So I'm still looking for a solution

 
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01-10-06, 08:01 PM   #4  
You can certainly cut off the doors to give the illusion that the bottom of the door is straight with the floor, it might make a person's eye not notice that it's out of level. But 5/8" is a lot, and a "critical eye" would notice that the door is not cut square on the bottom, even though the reveal is straight. It would certainly be the easiest way to fix your problem since levelling the floor with topping won't work in this instance.

If your bifold is going into a jamb, be sure you cut one jamb 5/8" shorter than the other so that the head of the jamb will sit level. Then you'll cut a tapered piece off the door, from nothing to 5/8. You'll find advice on cutting off doors in the forums as well. Likely old postings in the doors & windows forum or maybe panelling & trim. Scoring the door with a knife along a straightedge, and clamping a guide onto the door to guide your saw usually helps prevent splintering. Easing the edge with sandpaper finishes the cut off.

 
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01-10-06, 08:34 PM   #5  
Thanks again XSleeper--very helpful advice.
If I go the route of cutting an angle into the bottom of the doors, would placing masking tape over the span of the cut area help prevent splinters? It's one of the few tricks I remember from high-school wood shop.

 
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01-10-06, 09:05 PM   #6  
It would. also use a utility knife to score the line you are cutting, that is very effective in stopping splintering.

 
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01-11-06, 05:18 AM   #7  
Masking tape "helps" but it is not as effective as the method I refered to before, scoring the door and clamping a guide onto the door for the saw to follow. You'll still get splinters, just not as many of them. Scoring the door should eliminate splinters all together. Luan doors especially like to splinter and masking tape is of no help at all on them but fortunately they are very soft and easy to score. Splintering is caused by the teeth of the blade coming up through the wood. Splintering also tends to occur when the saw is not pushed smoothly in a perfectly straight line, so that's why clamping a saw guide to the door would help. It also helps you follow the cut line closely- staying just a hair away from it so as to let the chips clear.

 
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01-11-06, 05:27 AM   #8  
All good advice. One other tip that may help is to make the cut from the back of the door so any imperfections splinters will not be on the front of the door.

 
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01-11-06, 06:09 PM   #9  
Really appreciate the tips, guys. Thanks!

 
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