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Main Floor Joists Are Single 2x6's!! Help


blackflare93's Avatar
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02-06-06, 06:57 AM   #1  
Main Floor Joists Are Single 2x6's!! Help

I recently bought a house.. due to the fact that i'm getting married in april, 06 . I think i was too busy thinking about the 12 acres of woods it came with rather than the house it's self . This house was built in 87 by the person that we bought it from... and he was def a do-it-yourselfer but just really didn't know how to do it. We are redoing a good portion of the house and some of the stuff we are finding that he did is amazing . Anyways, onto the problem that i'm writing about! I have never used this site and was just doing searches so i'll rely on someone here to help me out! It seems like a good, honest site. Underneath part of my house, all the floor joists are 2x6's, including the two main supporting 2x6's. OH, and the two rows of main supporting 2x6's are SINGLE 2x6's.. yes... you read that correctly. One 2x6 running lenth ways holding up my house.. which not to mention, some of them are twisting and bowing between support blocks... The support blocks are 8 feet apart from each other (center to center) I have checked with 3 construction companies and all have quoted me between 1,800 and 2,000 smackers. OH... and i forgot to mention that for some reason he installed the furnace smack dab on top of one of the main supporting 2x6's so of course he simply cut part of the main 2x6 away so he could run the air into the crawl space. I am seriously considering doing this myself with the help of a couple buddies, one of which is in a construction company so he knows about that stuff. Should I attempt this on my own and save some serious cash? and if so, how do you jack up a house while replacing those boards!!?!?!?!?! I need some sort of guidence!!! WHY ME!!!

 
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Wayne Mitchell's Avatar
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02-06-06, 12:11 PM   #2  
The first things that come to mind - where are you located, was the house built with a permit and who did the inspection?

You can probably get away with adding 2X8s sistered alongside the existing joists. Since the rim joists are probably sized for 2X6s you'll have to figure out a way to support the wider ends of the new joists. Either notching the foundation or adding concrete pilasters and a ledger are possibilities. Depending on your setup you may be able to notch the end of the 2X8 and rest part of it on the sill and part directly on the foundation. If you do you'll have to protect the joist from rot.
More importantly is getting a correctly sized support beam in place. You can probably use a built up beam of three 2X12s' supported by lally posts or you can use an engineered beam (such as Versilam). The built up is cheaper and the materials are readily available. The engineered beam is stronger and much quicker to install. It is also more expensive.
A little research at the library or a talk with your local building official can help deciding what size beam and what size/spacing of posts is appropriate.
I just reread your post and noticed you have a crawl space, not a basement. You won't need lolly posts, just a support that should be on a poured footer.

 
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02-07-06, 07:00 AM   #3  
The house i bought is located in North West Indiana... and as far as him having a permit.. i would sure assume so but i have learned never to assume anything. i did notice that out in one of the small, junky sheds, there is a building permit stapled up but it's all faded... As far as the inspector goes, actually, after his second inspection, after the sellers fixed (or were supposed to fix) certain things, he did make the comment that "this is nearly a major defect, which would keep you from buying this house" well, we shouldn't of, but we bought it anyways, but at the time, I knew (kinda) what i was in for. I ordered some 2x10's and they are being delevered here today. My construction buddy is coming over tonight to give me some pointers. and as far as where he totally cut thru one of the main 2x6's, I think i will just move the furnace a couple feet so the new 2x10's cna just run straight thru without running into the furnace. I have NEVER done this kind of thing before but i enjoy learning and doing stuff like this. One question i have, what exactly is a rim joist? is it just simply the board running underneath the house but around the house? these 2x6's that are the main supporting just go to the inside edge of the house and stop.. the actual main 2x6 is not hooked into anything at the edge of the house.. nor is it sitting on anything... but the 1st cement supporting blocks are about 2 feet from the edge of the house... so there is not even a couple feet hanging out between the block and the actual house foundation... is that a bad idea? This area of the house is roughly 33 feet long and um.... 20 feet wide.. the two rows of the single main 2x6's are running the length of the 33 feet. and as far as protecting from rot....????....???? it's nice and warm in the crawl space (probably due to his crappy running of the furnace vents) and very dry... nice sand!! thanks for your time!!!

 
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02-07-06, 07:10 AM   #4  
you may really want to consider have a contractor do the work. Tehy will know the proper load bearing requirments and I am not sure how safe it even is under there. Working down there knowing the whole house is above me on 2x6s I am a GC in michigan and I woudl not get under there for $1800 does that include Materials? Seems cheap realy cheap.

 
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02-07-06, 07:47 AM   #5  
YA, I HEAR YA!! IT'S FREAKING NUTS!! Yes, the price includes materials, of which i have on the way and is a cost of 200 dollars. One of the firms builds houses in merrillville and my agen is still working with me on this deal and she set him up to come give me a quote-so i think he was doing it cheaper as a favor, and the other construction guy i had look at it does some work for us at our farm and also at my brother's house so we know him. and i have had a couple people tell me that that is an excellant price. so, i agree. it is a real good deal. one firm that looked at it before we bought it quoted 1800 JUST to fix around the furnace where they cut the main 2x6. that was with pouring some cement slabs and blocks. ( i just found out about this last night.) I never knew owning a house was so much fun. thanks.

 
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02-09-06, 09:17 AM   #6  
o.k.. i think i'm going to just move my furnace a few feet to get it away from the main supporting boards that i am going to put in... then i'll replace the main supporting single 2x6, section at a time between supporting blocks, using jacks we have around the farm here to support the house while i take out 2x6's and bust out the top blocks so the new 2x10's will fit.. then come summer time (after the wedding) I will go under and on all the supports running the other way, i will put a 2x6 sistering all the existing 2x6's to help stirdy it up even more.. that's a LOT of 2x6's... hopefully after all this, i'll never have to worry about it again....

 
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02-13-06, 06:29 AM   #7  
moved the furnace!!

o.k. i moved my furnace over the weekend!!! what a pain!!!! not fun at all. but got her done and feel pretty good about it! now, onto the floor supports this coming weekend.

 
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