screw vs. nail

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Old 03-15-06, 03:47 PM
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screw vs. nail

Hi
Can somebody tell if in framing, does it make any difference if we use wood screws instead of traditionl use of nails?
Thanks
Cyrus
 
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Old 03-15-06, 04:37 PM
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I believe screws are a code violation in framing.
 
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Old 03-15-06, 05:01 PM
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Mitch is correct. screws are a no no in framing. Most codes want 16d framing nails. If you are using pressure treated lumber, you may have to use galvanized nails. If you are using foundation
treated lumber you must use stainless steel nails. Good Luck
 
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Old 03-15-06, 05:02 PM
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You may see the use of screws to hold subflooring to floor joists. Otherwise, it's nails. Here's why: most screws are more brittle than nails and will break off rather than bend and continue to hold. Almost all framing joints are shear-loaded (at right angles to the length of the fastener) rather than tension-loaded (pulling apart along the length of the fastener). Nails are stronger than screws in a shear-loaded joint.
 
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Old 03-15-06, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by IBM5081
Nails are stronger than screws in a shear-loaded joint.
Yup, nails are much stronger in shear. Screws are generally stronger in a tension load though.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Jack the Contractor
Mitch is correct. screws are a no no in framing. Most codes want 16d framing nails. If you are using pressure treated lumber, you may have to use galvanized nails. If you are using foundation
treated lumber you must use stainless steel nails. Good Luck
Just to clarify..

Most of those codes want _full head_ 16d framing nails. So if you are using/buying a framing nailer, make sure it takes full head nails, not 'clipped head'.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Pendragon
Just to clarify..

Most of those codes want _full head_ 16d framing nails. So if you are using/buying a framing nailer, make sure it takes full head nails, not 'clipped head'.

It must be a Regional thing because around here in NJ I've never once used a 16d nail before. Every nail on a house is 10d for all framing except for toenailing wall studs. We use 8d's for toenailing wall studs, decking and sheathing.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 06:38 PM
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Now that we are into the clipped vs. full and 16D vs. 10D nails it's not that simple. I have the Hitachi RH framer and the Paslode CH framer. Paslode now has Roundrive framing nails with round heads that fit a clipped-head nailer. The nail shank is offset from the center of the head and once the nail is driven, all that you see is a complete round head. Since the nail shanks are offset, you still get the increased magazine capacity because the nail shanks atr touching in the paper collation. I use 3" nails for all framing.
 
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Old 03-16-06, 07:27 PM
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Pendragon is correct, they should be full headed nails (full round). I guess I just assumed you would use those. Use the 16d with a full head. Good Luck
 
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Old 03-17-06, 06:38 AM
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In my area a clipped head 16d is acceptable. Framing with 10d would not be. Code here is 16d for all framing except 12d nails (4) may be used for toenailing studs. 8d is used for sheathing.
 
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Old 03-17-06, 04:17 PM
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Building codes vary on nails but no screws except on decking as in sheathing. why would you want to use screw to frame anyway? That would be pretty slow going. I think about how fast I can bury a 16 into a 2x4. no one with a screw gun could keep up not even close.
 
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Old 03-17-06, 04:21 PM
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There are special screws intended for securing subfloors called ballistic screws which can be installed with a roundhead framing nailer. With a square-drive head, they can be removed as any other screw. As I recall, they are about 2.5" long.
 
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Old 03-27-06, 05:27 PM
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To finish my basement, I am going to make frames beside the interior walls. Considering the fact that these frames will only hold drywalls, is there any differnce between use of screws and nails?
Thank
Cyrus
 
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