Framing lumber for a shed

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  #1  
Old 04-04-06, 08:25 AM
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Framing lumber for a shed

I am planning on building a 12x12 shed with a 3 or 4:12 roof pitch and sided with Hardipanel. The 4x8 hardipanel sheets weigh about 70 lbs each and I'll be framing the roof with 2x6s, sheathing and asphalt shingles. Can I safely frame the walls with 2x3 lumber rather than 2x4? What are the other considerations I need to take into account? Thanks.
 
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Old 04-06-06, 07:35 PM
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What are you going to do with the additional 1" on each side of the shed you gained by scrimping on framing lumber? You have planned the roof so well, with detail, and the walls hold up the roof, so I would definitely go with the 2x4 at minimum. Save the 2x3 for mobile home manufacturers. Don't forget to cross brace your walls if you don't plan on any osb on the exterior.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 04:54 AM
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Thanks Larry. Will take your advice and go with the 2x4's. That was my first inclination anyway. Just wanted some more experienced opinions.

Originally Posted by chandler
Don't forget to cross brace your walls if you don't plan on any osb on the exterior.
Any chance you or someone else could elaborate on this? How would I do this? The Hardipanel wouldn't serve this purpose? Thanks.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 06:45 AM
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Frame it 16' on center and the hardy board is fine. I am asuming you are using 4x8 sheets that look like primed T-111. If so then no cross bracing is needed.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by RYANINMICHIGAN
Frame it 16' on center and the hardy board is fine. I am asuming you are using 4x8 sheets that look like primed T-111. If so then no cross bracing is needed.
Thanks. Yup, thats exactly what I'm using. So, 2x4's 16" OC should suffice? Thanks.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 07:04 AM
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Another question I have is regarding the roof structure. I am planning a 4:12 pitch. With a 12' shed width, what size lumber should I use for the ridge beam and the rafters and roughly how long will the rafters be so I can estimate how much lumber I need. Are 2x4 rafters 16"OC ok without worrying about sagging 10 years from now? Would using 2x6s for the rafters be "over-building" it? I'm in Connecticut so snow is fairly common, but not in terms of feet or anything in regards to load. Thanks.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by johnCT
Another question I have is regarding the roof structure. I am planning a 4:12 pitch. With a 12' shed width, what size lumber should I use for the ridge beam and the rafters and roughly how long will the rafters be so I can estimate how much lumber I need. Are 2x4 rafters 16"OC ok without worrying about sagging 10 years from now? Would using 2x6s for the rafters be "over-building" it? I'm in Connecticut so snow is fairly common, but not in terms of feet or anything in regards to load. Thanks.
For a shed, you could use either a 1x6 or 2x6 for the ridge beam. 2x4 rafters would be fine. 16" OC is great- normally roofing is 24" OC. Roof sheathing could be 1/2" with h-clips or 5/8" without clips. I'd suggest the heavier sheathing.

Your roof will be like a triangle about 2' high and 12' long. Half the roof would be 2' high and 6' long. (4:12 pitch) So your rafters would be about 6'6", plus your overhang. If you're not having much of an overhang, you might be able to get 14' lumber and cut it in half to make 2 rafters.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 08:57 AM
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I agree that since it's a shed it would probably work fine to use the hardipanel to brace and square the walls, but you'll probably want to brace the walls with a let-in brace. Either 1x4 bracing or steel bracing.

Steel bracing is shaped like a T. You build your wall on the ground, square it by measuring the wall diagonally each way, then cut a diagonal kerf across it with your skilsaw, then the bracing fits into that notch, and you nail it to each stud. this serves to keep your walls square so that they do not rack. It's very easy to do.

Instructions for installing Hardipanel can be found on the JamesHardie website by first clicking on Hardipanel, then going to instructions.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 09:35 AM
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Let in bracing is not required for this application. Using 4x8 sheets effectively creates all the bracing you need. I suggest using LP Smart Panels instead. They are much easier to work with and also not dangerous to your health in terms of the dust created by cutting it. LP has a I believe a 50 year warranty.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 09:36 AM
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Yes use 2x4 for the walls and the roof 16 on center and you will have a well built shed.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 10:12 AM
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Thanks for the replies guys. Unfortunately though, using something other than Hardipanel is not an option since I've already purchased it. Lowes had it on clearance for $10 a sheet. Couldn't pass it up. Shouldn't need to cut very much with a 12'x12' dimension, but will most likely borrow a pnuematic shear to use anyway.

What about overhang? Is there a standard roof overhang?
 
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Old 04-11-06, 08:16 AM
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I would say a foot to 18" on the overhang. You didnt mention the flooring you'll be using. If its wood, a nice trick is to build the floor and screw lumber to it to have a template for making trusses. I think this is the easiest way to make the roof. I used half inch sheathing for the gussets.
 
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Old 04-12-06, 07:05 AM
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Originally Posted by chris8796
You didnt mention the flooring you'll be using. If its wood, a nice trick is to build the floor and screw lumber to it to have a template for making trusses. I think this is the easiest way to make the roof. I used half inch sheathing for the gussets.

Thanks Chris. The floor will be a 5.5" slab. The roof I am planning on an 2x8 ridge beam and 2x4 rafters 16" OC. So I'll use a foot for the overhang I guess.
 
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Old 04-17-06, 10:22 AM
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Nuther question...

It is not necessary to use a sill plate when framing walls on a slab, right? The bottom plate becomes the sill plate, in effect, and should be made with pressure treated lumber, right? Thanks.
 
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Old 04-17-06, 11:38 AM
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That's the way I've seen it done. J-bolts to hold it down and a bead of adhesive on the bottom face - helps keep bugs out.
 
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Old 04-17-06, 12:03 PM
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Thanks.
 
  #17  
Old 04-18-06, 07:16 AM
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Just a couple of reminders/suggestions that I did not see above.

Don't forget the Tyvek or moisture barrier between the hardi-board and the studs.

Make sure your studs are not 8' (96") as that is the size of your hardi-board and you don't want to have to splice it at the top. Allow for the bottom and top plates.

You may want to double stud where the panels come together. This will reduce the risk of the edges breaking when you nail.

Will you be using any simpson connectors for tieing down the trusses or the studs to the bottom plate?

Good luck. I just framed my 18' x 22' garage/shed this past weekend. Hope to sheath and roof this coming weekend. Then Hardi-board lap siding.

DWC
 
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Old 04-18-06, 07:35 AM
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Thanks DWC. I wasn't planning on using a moisture barrier and was planning on buying the precut studs.

Originally Posted by dwcurry
Will you be using any simpson connectors for tieing down the trusses or the studs to the bottom plate?
You mean the roof rafters to the top plate, right? Actually, I hadn't thought of that yet. Is that the best way? Can't just toe-nail them?
 
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Old 04-18-06, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by johnCT
Thanks DWC. I wasn't planning on using a moisture barrier and was planning on buying the precut studs.



You mean the roof rafters to the top plate, right? Actually, I hadn't thought of that yet. Is that the best way? Can't just toe-nail them?
James Hardi recommends the moisture barrier. Tyvek or felt (tar paper) will work. Cement board is not water proof, water will penetrate it. If you ever put in insulation you are going to wish that you had put in the moisture barrier.

I live in Florida and mine is built to the new hurricane standards. I'm starting to believe that I have more metal than wood in my shed. Anyway, I'm using Simpson H-10 for my trusses to top plate. If you don't have to have approved plans, I would still go with Simpson H-5. It is what I used on my 12' by 12' shed 20 years ago and it withstood 4+ hurricanes. The termites done it in .

http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/h.html

I'm just a DIY'er like youself so these are just suggestions.

Good luck.

DWC
 
  #20  
Old 04-19-06, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by dwcurry
James Hardi recommends the moisture barrier. Tyvek or felt (tar paper) will work.
Well, yeah, but probably not for a shed.
 
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