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Remodeling Old Room - Removing Plaster, lath- worried about Stud Straightness

Remodeling Old Room - Removing Plaster, lath- worried about Stud Straightness

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  #1  
Old 04-10-06, 04:26 PM
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Remodeling Old Room - Removing Plaster, lath- worried about Stud Straightness

The ceiling in this old dining room was cracked and damaged. It is beyond simple plaster patches. A PO had really destroyed this sweet room by installing ventilation and water pipes on the ceiling (ripping the cieling appart where the pipes went to the second floor) and just installing an ugly drop-ceiling underneath.

Well, I bought this thing for the classiness of the house so all that has got to go.

My plan is to redo the whole room. I could keep plaster on the walls, but I really just hate the whole inflexibility of plaster and also the trim needs replaced and it's just easier to drywall all of that since some plaster seems to be locking in the old trim cause it's gooped over it.

I'll try to explain my plan so I can get some advice/warnings from you people. I want to create a tray ceiling. This would give a decorative raised-middle-ceiling effect, if you know what I mean. The lower part of the ceiling would allow me to run duct/pipes until they are parrallel with the rafters and so then can fit into the space between the rafters while running above the elevated middle rectangle part of the cieling.

I think that taking off the plaster and lath will be messy and physically hard but I understand how to do it. After researching this stuff my real worry is the Stud straightness for the drywall - as it is an older home. I really want to do this myself and I'd like it to be as easy as possible. Is there an easy way to get straight studs w/out shimming and all that bull? If shimming is the answer how does it work?

1. I dont suppose I could just nail another piece of wood to these studs, parallel to them, to create "sister" studs that are nice and straight for the drywall? If so can I do this for the ceiling too? I'd then screw the drywall to these "sister" studs. Is using too many sister studs ever a bad thing?

2. Two of these wall are exterior walls. When I remove the Lath it will probably expose the blown-in insulation? If so kind of insulation would you recommend to put back in them? I saw this stuff that looked like spray-on Foam before, is that any good?

3. Is there any other layer of protection I need for any walls besides Insulation, then drywall? What is a vapor barrier and should i use one?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-10-06, 04:46 PM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
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I don't see any reason why you couldn't sister studs/joists to get a plumb and flat wall or ceiling. For insulation I would just use kraft faced on the exterior walls and eliminate the need for an additional vapor barrier. I don't know enough about expanding foam insulation to make a recommendation, but I think you would have to hire a pro to install it.
 
  #3  
Old 04-10-06, 04:49 PM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
I don't see any reason why you couldn't sister studs/joists to get a plumb and flat wall or ceiling. For insulation I would just use kraft faced on the exterior walls and eliminate the need for an additional vapor barrier. I don't know enough about expanding foam insulation to make a recommendation, but I think you would have to hire a pro to install it.
Shimming is actually pretty simple. First thing to do is to run a streing across the ceiling joists after the plaster and lathe is removed. That will tell you exactly how bad the ceiling is. Then it's just a matter of cutting shims or sistering DW nailers to even out the ceiling.
 
  #4  
Old 04-11-06, 03:07 AM
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Thanks Wayne, I'll look into those Drywall nailers. I havent heard of them yet as an option. I assume they just nail into studs for stability and then the drywal can just hang/nail into the DW nailers? are they available at most hardware stores?

Otherwise I'll probably sister with either wood or metal studs. Thanks for the good information. I havent even looked at the studs yet but just preparing for the worst.
 
  #5  
Old 04-11-06, 11:49 AM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
Hi Joe - a dry wall nailer is just a piece of wood that you nail up to give you a level or plumb surface to screw the drywall to. It can be a piece of scrap 2X4 or 2X3 nailed alongside joists or studs.
 
  #6  
Old 04-11-06, 12:15 PM
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ah ok thanks. that sounds basically like the sister-stud thing. Studs are 2x4's I think, of course joists are much bigger. Maybe the 2x3's will be much cheaper.
 
  #7  
Old 04-18-06, 08:47 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 34
Lightbulb straight studs in older homes

It has been my experience that most of the structural lumber in older homes is much straighter than new lumber that you can purchase today!. A couple of tricks that I learned after a lenghty remodel in our current house - circa 1903 -

run a string line/chalk line horizontally across the studs to find out just how far out they really are at the bottom, middle, and top.

pay close attention to joint placement. Make sure that the joints don't fall over a fire stop or some other high spot - especially over a butt joint.

if you hang the sheets of drywall horizontally instead of vertically - like is done in most kitchens - avoid joints at eye level. for example, for an 8' ceiling, don't hang a 4' on top of a 4' to make 8. the joint will be at 4', and if not taped off perfectly, it will stick out like a sore thumb. Instead, rip a 4x8 down to 2 - 2x8 sheets, lay up a 2', then a 4', and finish off with the other 2' sheet. just make sure to match the tapers.

how to make new drywall look really good for not a lot of $$$ to the plaster guys - high build primer. This stuff is great. it hides imperfections because it goes on thick and levels out. You will probably have to rent a paint sprayer to apply the stuff, but it works great. Your paint store should be able to help you out.

oh yeah, and the best trick of all for corners -- if you are not that good with corners, get them close, sand them down, and using paintable latex caulk, run a bead down the corner and smooth it out with your finger. you will be amazed with the results. plus, the flexible caulking won't pull away and crack if anything moves.
 
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