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Need to raise old porch floor level to meet kitchen

Need to raise old porch floor level to meet kitchen


  #1  
Old 04-27-06, 05:10 AM
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Lightbulb Need to raise old porch floor level to meet kitchen

Hi, this is my first post, so please forgive any silly girl questions. I have been renovating my own homes through the years, includ. interior wall framing, sheetrock install & finish, kitchen countertop granite tiles, trevertine flooring/shower/tub surround, install sinks. I am pretty much a trial and error learner. And the husband is handsome but not very handy, he refers to himself as my assistant, gopher, 'boy', etc.
So N E WAY...We are buying his grandma's house (2BR 1BA 1000 sf. bungalow blt. 1948 in a 'transitional' neighborhood). There is a room off the VERY small kitchen that was used as a kind of pantry/dining room, but was a porch in the very distant past. You step down through what was the old exterior door opening about 1 foot. I want to widen the door opening and raise the 'porch' floor (concrete slab) up to meet the existing kitchen floor, then use tile or stone over it all.
I'm thinking the easiest way to do it (without paying someone else, that is) is to use joist hangers (like we did on the deck) and 2x10's with a plywood subfloor then cement board and tile. AM I on the right track here, or do I need help? I can see in my mind how this (and all my 'projects') will work, but in reality who knows? There is already some old indoor/outdoor carpeting out there, so I'm guessing that's enough vapor barrier, plus it's heated and cooled space. Any opinions would be great.
 
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Old 04-27-06, 06:10 AM
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When you raise the floor you may have a ceiling height problem. You did not mention how high it was so I will assume it is plenty high. 2x10 with joist hangers will work but you need to make sure you are not over spanning them or you will have a deflection problem. Other then that sounds like a solid plan. Oh ya you will want to insulate the joist bays before you put down the sub floor.
 
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Old 04-27-06, 12:12 PM
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Kim - You're definitely on the right track and none of your questions are silly. If it were me I would not rely on whatever is on the slab now as a vapor barrier. As a minimum I would strip the carpet. I would probably put down a poly vapor barrier. It sounds like you are going to end up with an unventilated space and you don't want to smell deteriorating carpet in a couple of years.

Be sure to do the math when selecting and installing your joists. You don't want to exceed span limits or you might end up with a springy floor. Not good under tile. Be sure to add the subfloor, underlayment, backerboard, and tile thickness so that your finish floor is even with the existing stoop.
 
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Old 04-27-06, 02:11 PM
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Thanks

Ryan & Wayne: Thanks for the replies. And yes, the ceiling is the same height as the kitchen, so I just want to make the space look more like an extension of the small kitchen and less like an old converted porch.

By insulation, what exactly did you mean? I know there are some other places elsewhere in the house that will need some expanding foam type insulation, I thought this room more than others because of it's former life as a porch. Or were you talking about the pink stuff laid between the joists and under the subfloor?
Thanks!
 
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Old 04-28-06, 09:41 AM
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yes the pink stuff. this will quite the hollow sound and help keep the heat and cold out. Also a poly vapor barrier would be a good idea under the joists.
 
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Old 04-30-06, 08:56 AM
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Kimberly: Also think about how the exterior looks once you make the modifications. Will you have to do anything, like exterior door, window height adjustment, etc.? I grew up in Forest Park, so I know of the type home you are talking about. Solid as a rock. Good luck with the project.
 
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Old 04-30-06, 10:12 AM
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Thanks Larry

Larry,
How strange, I grew up in Forest Park, Graduated Forest Park High School in 1985. Small world!
I did think about the window, but they are high enough that the floor adjustment won't be a problem, but there is an exterior door in the back (not seen from the street). I think we're gonna leave a portion of the room at the lower height and use it as a 'mud room' where you can come in through the back door after parking in the carport. I think the washer & dryer may be there also. It'll be a step up into the new dining/pantry area, so a good place to put the groceries down, etc. We're thinking of all ways to squeeze room and function out of this tiny (1000sf) house.
Thanks for the reminder!
 
 

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