Cut Floor Joist

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Old 05-26-06, 08:52 AM
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Cut Floor Joist

We're buying a house that has a sagging (1/2" or so) floor in the kitchen and it's also affecting the bedroom wall directly above it (small settlement cracks). In the crawl space, we discovered the cause was where a joist had been cut for duct work to replace a furnace with an exterior gas heat system. The joist is now only toe-nailed to a small girder piece with no support from the center beam and pier. The inspector said it should be a simple fix by placing a screw jack beneath the spot where the joist was cut. There is a french drain around the crawl space perimeter and everything is completely dry, no moisture problems in the soil. Let me know if I'm on the right track:

1) Should I excavate 12" or so and pour a small concrete foundation pad for the jack?

2) I assume I should place the jack at the point where the joist was cut (furthest point from foundation contact).

3) Should I do any shoring/stiffening to the girder "box" around the ductwork where the joist is now connected, to help transfer the load to the beam...if so, should I wait until the floor is level (with the screw jack adjustments)?

Thanks for help!!!
 
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Old 05-26-06, 09:25 PM
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You are on the right track. The only thing I would do differently is to, rather than installing the jack at the point of deflection is to span 2 joists on either side of the offending joist (for a total of 3) with a 4x6 on its side on top of the jack. That way you are spreading out the weight. If boxing is possible, I would do that after you got it level and supported well.
 
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Old 06-01-06, 07:03 PM
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Thanks for the reply Chandler!

A couple of clarifications:

The offending joist is already 2-2x6 members (sistered)...should I stiffen further, adding two more joists totalling four, or is that overkill?

Do you think a steel plate at the top may work better for spreading the load?...worried about compression on wood flat on its side
 
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Old 06-02-06, 06:02 AM
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You are ok with the steel plate, but it will deflect in time. It would have to be in the form of an I beam to prevent that. You won't have an appreciable compression on a 4x6 beam, standing on edge. Your footing idea is proper, also. Good luck with it.
 
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Old 07-02-06, 06:53 PM
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I'm actually getting to doing this and I see what you're saying now. I was talking about a steel plate at the footing. You're saying to create a "beam" across the joists...will try that, thanks!
 
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