Clipped head ok for framing?

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  #1  
Old 06-26-06, 06:55 AM
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Clipped head ok for framing?

I've got an opportunity to pick up a framing nailier for a decent price but it's a clipped head gun instead of a full head gun. I can't really think of any reason this wouldn't be alright, but I figured it wouldn't hurt to check with some of the pros here. I've always either hand nailed or screwed whatever I was working on, but I recently began the process of rehabbing a house and having a gun would make things go alot faster.
 
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Old 06-26-06, 09:27 AM
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Paslode makes a round-head nail that feeds in clipped-head framing nailers. They are called Roundrive and the nail shank is offset from the center of the head. If these nails will feed and shoot from the nailer under consideration, then you should be good to go. I use them in the Paslode F350S, but they should work in most other nailers as well.
 
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Old 06-26-06, 10:27 AM
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I believe the only state that has stipulated round head only is Floriduh. I have built many structures, including buildings, decks, etc. and have yet to have a failure due to a nailhead pulling off a clipped head stack. And if the wood doesn't pull off the head, who is to say it is inferior to round head nails? This is my opinion, and is not to be construed to be untainted.
 
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Old 06-26-06, 01:37 PM
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I have not seen any requirement against the use of clipped head nails for framing. State Farm states that in regards to roof sheathing:

"Some types of power nail guns use "clipped head" nails (also known as modified round-head nails and P-nails). These are nails with heads that have a portion of the head removed so the nails can be packaged tightly together and still be driven.

Because the heads are smaller, it is easier for the roof-sheathing panel to be pulled off over the nail head in high winds. Gun-driven nails are available with full heads. These should be used if nail guns are the chosen method of installation. The building codes in Broward and Dade Counties require roof-sheathing nails to have full heads."

If you are really concerned, check with the Building Department in your area.

Chandler, when did Geogia move from wooden pegs to nails?

DWC
 
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Old 06-26-06, 07:42 PM
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1794, I believe. I was fortunate enough to do work in the old Chamber of Commerce building in Madison County, Georgia, circa 1793. Climbed up into the attic, and just sat there in amazement at the beams, half lapped, pegged, mortised and tenoned, gee, you name it.
I have heard restrictions, not by the insurance companies, but by the political powers to be in the inspection departments, that clipped head nails were not to be used in any construction in Fla. Have you heard that>
 
  #6  
Old 06-27-06, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler
I have heard restrictions, not by the insurance companies, but by the political powers to be in the inspection departments, that clipped head nails were not to be used in any construction in Fla. Have you heard that>
No, but I'm a DIY'er and not a professional. Everything I've done is with full heads. I'll check into it.

DWC
 
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