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Subfloor not level.. by 1/4". Use of a contractor to fix?

Subfloor not level.. by 1/4". Use of a contractor to fix?


  #1  
Old 07-08-06, 11:43 PM
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Subfloor not FLAT.. by 1/4". Use of a contractor to fix?

Tore up the carpet in the main room in prep. for new flooring.
Unfortunately I found that the subfloor is nowhere near flat enough and I suspect the subfloor will need to be ripped up and at least two joists will need to be planed down and new subfloor put on top. My problem is I just went through this on another section of the floor and it was a total PITA. I am considering looking for a contractor to "flatten my floor".

Is this advisable? What kind of licenses/certs/experience etc should I be looking for? I'm a wee bit worried about having someone do a subpar job (i.e., not support all edges of replacement subfloor, such as near walls) but doing this myself will add at least a month (of weekends) to the project which I really can't afford to do.
 

Last edited by mcm; 07-14-06 at 07:25 PM.
  #2  
Old 07-13-06, 12:19 PM
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I have moved this thread here to Framing & SubFlooring as I think it would be better here and perhaps someone will have an answer for you.
 
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Old 07-13-06, 06:04 PM
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What kind of floor, and what room. I have seen old houses (mine) be over 1 inch off. A 1/4 of an inch is nothing unless it is under a tub, vanity, or something that must be level. I really think it would be hard to see.
 
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Old 07-13-06, 07:39 PM
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11/16" plywood (yeah, the stuff you cant get anymore...) subfloor.

The room is the living room -- the kitchen which is "attached" in a sense is similarly affected (I can feel it under the linoleum).

The living room is ~ 400sqft, but the area primarily affected is ~80sqft (1/5th of it).

The manufacturer of the hardwood planks (3/4" solid) im putting down say no more than 3/16" height diff over 10 feet. CarpetsDoneWright from the flooring forum is often very critical of subfloor flatness and stresses the need for it, and I don't want problems in 5-10 years. I *could* probably pad up the low edge w/ 30# felt, but it might squish in a number of years and make noises.

I have a picture also:

http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/2...gutted16va.jpg
http://img380.imageshack.us/img380/4...gutted24bx.jpg

Also curious what that white paint might be for... theres a lot near the sliding glass doors, with pink pen roughly drawing a squiggly border within which the paint was applied there (water damage repaired with some dry rot preventing paint? wtf?)

Also don't know what that brown **** in the middle is.. Some weird stuff going on during construction?
 
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Old 07-14-06, 02:33 AM
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Ever consider a self leveling patch? Might want to think about it. Mix and pour then let it cure.
 
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Old 07-14-06, 04:53 AM
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A flat subfloor isn't the same as a level subfloor.

The subfloor needs to be flat, so what's on top doesn't flex, move or, in the case of ceramic tile, crack.

Levelness is of little consequence, in fact in the case of say, a walk in ceramic tile shower, the floor will be sloped on all sides towards the drain.

11/16" is awefully thin for a subfloor though, especially for anything more than carpet, unless it's laying on concrete.

If that truely is paint, it could be, well, paint.
If not, I'm betting it's floor patch, made to fill small holes and spots in the plywood to make it smooth.

Brown stuff could be anything, something spilled during construction, etc.
 
  #7  
Old 07-14-06, 05:36 AM
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Sub-floor

What is underneath? Basement? Crawl space? Was floor jacked up previously? Perhaps too much?
 
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Old 07-14-06, 03:59 PM
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1/4" off side to side is well within acceptable for a floor. Houses aren't perfect. Throw a carpenters square in every corner of the house for some fun.
 
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Old 07-14-06, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Pendragon
A flat subfloor isn't the same as a level subfloor.

The subfloor needs to be flat, so what's on top doesn't flex, move or, in the case of ceramic tile, crack.

Levelness is of little consequence, in fact in the case of say, a walk in ceramic tile shower, the floor will be sloped on all sides towards the drain.
I understand this, the subject of this thread is mis-specified.

EDIT: I have corrected the thread subject

Originally Posted by Pendragon
11/16" is awefully thin for a subfloor though, especially for anything more than carpet, unless it's laying on concrete.
The wood floor manu. (BR-111) states a minimum of 5/8" ply. I have already laid ~200sqft of the flooring in another area leading up to this one, most of that was quite flat so I didn't consider ripping up everything and re-laying 3/4" to be an option at the time. Now it's not because it would introduce a step up from the existing installed flooring which would be horrendous.

I'm not sure if it's of any consequence but the joists are 16" OC and 2x10s.

EDIT: Manufacturer says 5/8" ply subfloor is fine if joists are 16" OC. If joists are over 19.2" OC manufacturer recommends 1" to 1 & 1/8" subflooring.

So I should be ok w/ this subfloor.
 

Last edited by mcm; 07-14-06 at 07:34 PM.
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Old 07-14-06, 07:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Wirepuller38
What is underneath? Basement? Crawl space? Was floor jacked up previously? Perhaps too much?
A large "walk space". No evidence of the floor being jacked up.

The raised section seems to be along a wall underneith along that run. This wall has a foundation under it, it could be sagging on either side of that more substantial support I suppose.
 
  #11  
Old 07-14-06, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Hellrazor
1/4" off side to side is well within acceptable for a floor. Houses aren't perfect. Throw a carpenters square in every corner of the house for some fun.
1/4 across the whole floor would be fine, this is within an 8 foot span (less actually, but my level/straight edge is 8 foot). The manufacturer's specs indicate no more than 1/8" over 8 feet or 3/16" over 10 feet.

http://www.br111.com/pdf/34Solid_Install.pdf

Straight out of this, the following:

Originally Posted by BR-111 Installation Instructions
Level/flat within 3/16" over 10' and/or 1/8" over 6'. High areas or joints can be sanded flat. Low spots can be lifted to flat using shims or layers of builders felt between wood and sub-flooring during installation.
I don't want to sand down too much and reduce the subfloor thickness. I did double layer 30# roofing felt in one small (4 sqft) area in the part I've already done.

I guess I could "map out" the low spots carefully and lay extra felt there to make everything dead flat -- though CarpetsDoneWright from the flooring forum doesn't seem to like this crutch.
 
 

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