stacking drywall - too much weight?


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Old 07-26-06, 06:33 AM
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stacking drywall - too much weight?

hi

i'm about to finish up framing on a second floor renovation, and realized that before i put the last wall up, i need to get the drywall upstairs since there won't be enough room to manuever after framing is complete. i can't use a boom truck since the windows are way too small, and i'd prefer not to open up the exterior framing. in either case, i guess i still have a question since the drywall would be stored upstairs for a short length of time anyways.

i've calculated that i need 72 panels, most of which are going to be 5/8" thick.

my floor joists are only 2x8, and meet on a LB wall underneath, with one span 11', and the other span 13'. the subfloor is 3/4" t&g osb.

i'm assuming each drywall panel weighs about 40-50 pounds, for a total of about 3000 lbs. can anyone help me out in figuring if the floor will support this? i had planned on splitting the drywall up into 4 piles of 18 panels each.


thanks
 
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Old 07-26-06, 02:02 PM
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Splitting it up is the way to go. In fact, I would stack it on its side rather than flat, and stack it to the outer walls so the weight will bear on the last few inches of the joisting.
 
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Old 07-26-06, 05:39 PM
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Any particular reason for using the 5/8" rather than 1/2"?
 
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Old 07-26-06, 07:22 PM
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chandler, i don't think i can store it upright because it may block the access that my electrician (especially) and plumber would need

ibm5081 - i had decided to go with 5/8" to try and prevent ceiling sag (even though joists are 16" oc), and then decided to just go with it on the walls as well for the slightly additional sound deadening ability, since a bathroom separates the two bedrooms.

so, given that, do you think laying flat in 4 piles would be ok?
 
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Old 07-27-06, 04:11 AM
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Originally Posted by econguy
and then decided to just go with it on the walls as well for the slightly additional sound deadening ability, since a bathroom separates the two bedrooms.
For this, it would be best to place insulation batts in the wall cavity.
 
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Old 07-27-06, 04:57 AM
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Properly installed 1/2" drywall will not sag.
 
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Old 07-27-06, 06:47 PM
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When I was in construction, 5/8th was 'standard' for ceilings, even on 16" OC, but it's a MUST on 24" OC. Now 1/2" is used everywhere (though I think 5/8th is required for 24" OC).

As Wayne says, properlly installed, 1/2" shouldn't sag on 16" OC.

If I had the option however, I'd still use 5/8".

Insulation will do more for sound proofing than that extra 1/8" of drywall.

If you REALLY want soundproofing, insulate, and use 1/2" BC plywood on the walls. Added benefit: you can hang anything anywhere you want.

My math says at 3000 lbs, that's about 93 lbs/sq ft. Which is probably over the rated capacity of your floor.
If you can set each stack directly over the LB wall, you should be OK, but I'd be hesitent to stack it anywhere else, especially if the ceiling below is already finished, since the floor WILL sag under this much weight, and if the ceiling below is finished, it's going to have to be refinished after it cracks.
 
 

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