Moble Home replacing subfloor/load bearing wall?


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Old 09-10-06, 03:25 PM
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Moble Home replacing subfloor/load bearing wall?

We have a door at the back of the house that leaked and caused the subflooring, the bottom plate and load bearing 2x4 to rot. I discovered this by pulling up the stick and peel tiles laid by the previous owners. I was scratching away at the subfloor and guess what poked through and now see the ground below. The framework of the exteroir wall rests on the subfloor. How would we go about replcing the rotted wood? Is it possible to cut out the rotted part of the flooring and slide new flooring under the exterior wall frame then go about replacing the rotted frame work? hope this makes sense. Please help.
 
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Old 09-10-06, 05:19 PM
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Welcome to the forums

While MH walls are still load bearing they don't carry near the load of a conventionaly built home. Assuming that the rotted area isn't too long you shouldn't have any problem cutting out the bad and then replacing it.

The subfloor is most likely 5/8" particle board, replace the section you cut out with either plywood or osb. The 2x's should be standard sizes. Floor joists - 2x6, ext walls - 2x4.
 
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Old 09-10-06, 06:34 PM
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Thanks makrsr.

I went and looked at it again today. The exterior wall rests on the subfloor. The framework that makes up this wall has a bottom plate which runs the length of the floor and rests on the subfloor. Resting on that is a 2x4 that goes up to the ceiling, this piece rests on that bottom plate or 2x4. I noticed some of the bottom plate has crumbled out from under the 2x4 that goes up to the ceiling. The 2x4 that goes up to the cieling seems to still be sturdy by some amazing grace.

The area that has our back door is the laundry/utility room. The area needing to be replaced is approx 6ft long and 1ft into the room from the wall.

Our subfloors are thick plywood flooring.

If we were to tackle this ourselves which should we replace first the framing of the outter wall which is basically the bottom plate that needs to be replaced. The dammage also runs under the threshold plate of the door. Or the subflooring first?

We live in the Central texas area. If we were to hire someone to come fix this what could we expect to spend? This is our 1st home and I'm clueless in this stuff, so please forgive me.
Can anyone recommend someone?
If I were to try to hire someone what type of carpenter or home repair contracter should I be looking for?

I can take picture's tomorrow of this area and post them if it would help. some of the vinyl covered drywall has been removed.

Thanks in advance
 
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Old 09-11-06, 05:27 AM
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I would start by fixing the floor first. If possible replace any rotten floor joists. You will probably need to add 2x's to the floor framing to have adequate nailing surface for the patch piece of plywood.

Most MHs use 5/8" particle board for a sub floor. It is possible that someone has overlaid the sub floor with plywood to hide a weak floor. The main thing is for the patched area to be level with the rest of the undamaged floor. Take your thickness measaurements from an undamaged area as moisture makes particle board swell and it may not be as thick as it seems.

Most carpenters or handymen should be able to do the repair. Since removing the subfloor from underneath the sole plate [bottom of wall] can be a royal pain, make sure that whoever does the work removes as much as possible and inserts the new plywood atleast 1/2 way under the sole plate.

Labor costs vary greatly across the country so it would be hard to say what you should expect to pay. While it isn't neccesarily easy work it isn't overly complicated. Most diyers wouldn' find it to be a difficult job and the bragging rights [and experience] of having done it yourself can be priceless
 
 

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