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My cottage is missing a Lally Column....


IThoughtICould's Avatar
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Join Date: Oct 2006
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10-19-06, 10:10 AM   #1  
My cottage is missing a Lally Column....

We just bought a cottage that many years ago had a lally column removed to make space for a recroom. The beam has settled about 1 1/2 inches in the middle. I do not want to replace the column as it would limit the rooms usefulness. The span is 16 feet and the current beam is made of 3 2X12s. The house is a one and a half story and 24 feet wide The beam is right in middle with 12 foot 2x10 joists resting on top of the beam on either side. The floor above the 16 foot span in question has one carrying wall on it 2 feet from one end. (Of course it could not be right on top of the existing Lally column).

My Plan is to jack up the existing beam and then put a 2x12 (or 2x14) laminated Beam on each side of the existing beam attached with two 1/2" bolts every 16". The Beams I'm planning on using are made by VERSA-LAM

My question is will this be enough support? Is there a better option? I'm hoping to put hardwood down on the floor above when this is resolved if possible.

Any input is appreciated!! Thanks

 
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Concretemasonry's Avatar
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10-19-06, 11:27 AM   #2  
My cottage is missing a Lally Column

By arbitrarily removing the column, you probably overloaded the beam somewhat. Others or preferably, a structural engineer can tell you what to add to the beam to get your stresses in line.

No matter what you do, you will never be able to get to where you were with a column. Deflection is different than strength. In your planning for a flooring material, keep in mind you have a heavily loaded 16' long beam that will deflect.

Even if you add 2- 2x12, you will only decrease the deflection by about a little less than 1", which still may be more than you can tolerate with your new floor.

Dick

 
Joe Carola's Avatar
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10-19-06, 12:34 PM   #3  
[QUOTE=IThoughtICould]We just bought a cottage that many years ago had a lally column removed to make space for a recroom. The beam has settled about 1 1/2 inches in the middle. I do not want to replace the column as it would limit the rooms usefulness. The span is 16 feet and the current beam is made of 3 2X12s. The house is a one and a half story and 24 feet wide The beam is right in middle with 12 foot 2x10 joists resting on top of the beam on either side. The floor above the 16 foot span in question has one carrying wall on it 2 feet from one end. (Of course it could not be right on top of the existing Lally column).

People do stupid things like taking out lally columns everyday and wonder why these things happen. The column was there for a reason and now this is the result of stupidity.

No one here can answer your question unless they see your house. This has to be looked at by an Architect or Engineer.

Maybe you can get away with adding a beam on each side or maybe not. I have done it many times with wood and also with a flitch plate on each side. All of this was engineered though.

Jacking up your house 1-1/2" is not a small amount. You have to make sure that you have room at each end to fit anything on each side of the existing girder and resting them on the foundation also.

Do yourself a favor and call a Professional that can properly size this for you.

 
Wayne Mitchell's Avatar
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10-19-06, 04:06 PM   #4  
Another option is to get a beam sized on line. Manufacturers usually have span tables available on line for their products. I would size the beam for the required floor load and span as if it were to be a stand alone.

Jacking an existing floor 1 1/2" can be a challenge. Especially if you are moving a load bearing wall on the floor above. If you decide to jack the existing beam, do it in very small increments. Even moving slowly, you can expect some plaster/drywall cracks.

 
IThoughtICould's Avatar
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10-26-06, 08:09 AM   #5  
Thanks for the replies. I ran it by a few contractors with experiance in this type of thing. Instead of trying to strengthen the existing beam I'm going to be replacing the span where the lally column was removed with 4 - 2x14 laminated beams bolted together. A little more work than I wanted to do but I only want to have to do this once.

 
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