Framing wall and lowering ceiling


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Old 12-21-06, 11:17 PM
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Framing wall and lowering ceiling

The section of my basement that I need to frame has 8'-9" between the floor and the joists above. However, there are several pipes and other obstructions that hang below the joists. After measuring several of the obstructions, it appears the lowest point is 7'-10". Because of the numerous obstructions, we've decided to make the entire ceiling 7'-10" instead of building soffits around them. A couple questions about this:

1. How do I drop the ceiling by that much? Can I use 2x4's to brace 2x6's to the floor joists, essentially creating a soffit over the entire ceiling?

2. Should I frame the wall up to the existing joists or stop it where the new ceiling height will be?

3. Do I need to do anything to the existing wall that is already framed up to the joists at 8'-9"?

Thanks
 
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Old 12-22-06, 02:18 PM
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Just for consideration, since you have piping, air conditioning ductwork, drains, etc up there, you may want to entertain the thought of installing a drop ceiling. The 7'10" is quite adequate, and you should consider yourself lucky that you will have that left. So many don't have that luxury.
The drop ceiling will allow you access for emergency repairs, adding services, and general access to the rooms above it for installing things like phone lines, new receptacles, etc. down the road. With a sheetrocked ceiling, you limit yourself too much.
 
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Old 12-22-06, 08:09 PM
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I've considered that but don't particularly like the look of the tiles. Is there a suspended ceiling system that gives the look of drywall?
 
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Old 12-23-06, 06:06 AM
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They make solid tiles, but the grid itself would take away from the smoothness, and the close hanging systems don't give the accessibility mentioned earlier. You will find with a suspended ceiling using a profile edge, the sound resonance will be reduced, also. Can lighting, or drop in trofler lighting will be easier to install and maintain. Now, if you are set to do the drywall, you will have to frame the entire ceiling as if it were a new one, and suspend it from the existing framework for rigidity. Alot of work, but doable.
 
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Old 12-23-06, 08:04 PM
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Go to a regular drywall supplier and ask for 18ga. channel.
You can hang this channel from a 4x4 nailed between the existing floor joist,
a turnbuckle, or by adding an isolator with the turnbuckle should noise transmission become an issue.

To address your original question, frame the walls to the floor system above, for stability.
 
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Old 12-23-06, 08:45 PM
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After doing a little more research and some practical thinking, I think I've decided to go with a suspended ceiling. The suspended ceiling will probably be easier than having to frame a new ceiling to install the drywall. Now I just have to find a pattern that I like.

How do you install can lighting in a suspended ceiling? Do you just install the remodel housings directly into the ceiling tiles?
 
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Old 12-24-06, 06:57 AM
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Remodel cans would be ill-advised because unless you are using a rigid tile of 5/8 drywall, IE fire rated, cutting the hole weekend the tile and its weight and time will cause it to sag.

New construction cans come with hanger bars which will span the tops of the grid and the cans can be install from the adjacent bay.
If movement is a concern, there are clips available from elec. wholesalers for the attachment of the bars to the grid.
Because you are dealing with metal and the possibility of chaffing damage to romex, use metal clad conductors, for which there are also hanging clips.
 
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Old 01-11-07, 08:35 AM
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Question...

I don't want to steal this thread or anything but my question falls within it perfectly.

I am also looking at finishing my basement and am installing drop ceiling, however in the middle of my basement I have an I-beam that goes from one side to the other. How do I frame around this? If i simply install the drop ceiling at the lower height of the I-beam then I lose about a half a foot of space. I would like to not loose the space...

I hope that question makes sense. Basically, I think I need to frame around the I-Beam and drywall it then continue the ceiling.

Thanks for all your help!
 
 

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