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Adding studs to existing wall?


JasonInCali's Avatar
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01-24-07, 04:34 PM   #1  
Adding studs to existing wall?

Hello. I was hoping someone could help me with what I assume will be a fairly simple problem.

I have an old house, and the studs in the walls are 24" OC instead of the modern 16". My wife and I want to hang cabinets in the kitchen, but we're having difficulty coming up with a layout of wall cabinets such that every cabinet will have a stud behind it to attach to.

So I figure, why not pull off the drywall and add some more studs? Then we'd have more freedom in where to put wall cabinets, and what width we could use. Additionally, this would expose the wiring so we could run an additional electrical outlet with ease.

But I dunno how to space these additional studs. If I just split the difference, I'll end up with a wall that has 12" OC studs -- not standard. But there's no way to end up with 16" OC studs without removing some of the current 24" OC studs, right? And I'd rather not do that as this is a load-bearing wall.

So umm, any advice?

 
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Jack the Contractor's Avatar
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01-24-07, 05:00 PM   #2  
You can add your studs 16" OC, not a problem. You just have to be very careful of your measurements. Start at one stud and measure over 16" center to center and add your stud. Measure over another 16" and put in another stud. You now have studs 16" OC for 32". Your next 16" should fall on a existing stud, so you will not put one in there. Now just start over as I said above. Do not take out the existing studs. Good Luck

 
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01-25-07, 05:01 AM   #3  
You could also add horizontal blocking between all the studs, then you have complete freedom to put them anywhere, any size, any configuration. You have to get the blocking at the correct height though, but that is not a big deal. If you add studs then you have to go through the pain of drilling the holes for the new wires pull out all your existing wires first & hope your right angle drill fits everywhere you'll need it to fit & then you have to cut every single piece of insulation to fit the new cavity created my the new studs.

I have also seen people replace the drywall with same thickness plywood behind the cabinets.

Personally I am going to add the blocking in my remodel.

 
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01-25-07, 06:29 AM   #4  
Studs

The horizontal blocking is the way to go. Gives you the opportunity to attach cabinets with as many screws as you like where you like.

 
JasonInCali's Avatar
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01-25-07, 08:08 AM   #5  
Thanks for the advice, Jack. That's helpful.

I'm not familiar with horizontal blocking, how's that work? Is it just like those horizontal firebreak 2x4s that go between the studs?

I do like the plywood idea, too... that might be simplest of all, as there's no need to totally pull down the existing drywall. I guess I'd just carefully set the depth on a circular saw to cut away a stripe of drywall the same height as the cabinets, screw in some plywood the same thickness as the drywall, and then hang the cabinets. That seems pretty sturdy and straightforward.

Thanks!
Jason

 
marksr's Avatar
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01-25-07, 10:17 AM   #6  
Posted By: JasonInCali I'm not familiar with horizontal blocking, how's that work? Is it just like those horizontal firebreak 2x4s that go between the studs?
Blocking for cabinets is different than fire blocking. Instead of installing a 2x4 between the studs you want to use a 2x6 or larger, turned sideways. This will give you more surface area to secure the cabinets to.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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01-25-07, 11:49 AM   #7  
Yea use a 2x6 sideways as mentioned. As far as the plywood. If you go this route, make sure you know where the outline of the cabinets will be on the wall once they are mounted & cut in a couple inches, so you are certain the seems of drywall/plywood will be completely covered by the cabinets.

 
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01-25-07, 04:16 PM   #8  
Jasonincali:
I don't think I would partake in the blocking program if I were you. If you decide not to put in the studs, then go for the plywood on the wall trick. Screw it in tight. Good Luck

 
JasonInCali's Avatar
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01-26-07, 11:22 AM   #9  
Yeah, I think even 2x6 blocks aren't going to provide the sturdiest support when they're attached to 24" OC studs... that's a fairly long stretch of 2x6 with a lot of weight hanging off of it. I figure a fully loaded cabinet is what, 50 pounds maybe?

I think I will put in the studs after all, it just feels like the best way to go. Thanks to everyone for the help and suggestions!

 
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02-04-07, 12:20 PM   #10  
Kitchen Cabs

Im not sure what type of cabinets your using or the configuration of the Kitchen. If your talking about one long row of upper cabinets or an L shaped design. I normally will connect all the cabinets together on the floor with screws. Screw them through the front framing members ( making sure that you predrill and countersink the screw heads ) . After they are all screwed together locate your wall studs in relation to the assembled cabinets and mark the inside. Attach a piece of scrap wood to the wall at the height of the bottom of the cabinets to help hold them up while you screw them in. No more than three screws per stud needed. The main thing you need to consider when using this method is the last cabinet in the row, you dont want this to be held in place with only the face screws.

You may need help lifting up a 10' length screwed together

 
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