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Man Beam Issues


jlcalbre's Avatar
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 119
VA

03-07-07, 05:52 PM   #1  
Man Beam Issues

I recenty bought a 100 yr old house to renovate. Of course, I am now discovering all the hidden "features" of the house, one of which is that a good portion of the main beam across the back of the hose needs to be replaced. The current beam is probably at least 8X8 solid wood. The beam also runs parralel to the joists. I know I need to put in a couple of new piers, but the issue is how to get the beam out. It is balloon construction, so the wall studs rest directly on this beam, with no type of bottom plate. How can I jack things up and support those studs to get the old beam out and new stuff in?

 
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aq_guy's Avatar
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Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 110
OK

03-08-07, 08:56 AM   #2  
I'm doing something sort of similar to replace the (almost non-existant) foundation of my detached garage, [Don't get me started on the PO.]

I have a double 2x10 16' beam that I fasten into the wall studs through the siding using long lag screws. I pierce the wall where necessary to install perpendicular shorter beams to support the main beam, the supprot beams then rest on temporary piers of cement block. Ordinary 10-ton bottle jacks easily lift the wall off the slab so I can demolish it and repour a proper foundation one section at a time. I've got one side done, and as we speak one section is hanging from the beam waiting on drier weather so I can get badk to work on it. [Wife had indoor projects for me this winter.]

But you have a substantially larger job, in that you will need to replace the entire beam at once. It is very likely to take a beefy steel beam to temporarily support the wall. And I wouldn't be surprised if we were talking about a 2-story structure much heavier than my garage.

It will be important to know whether ceiling and/or second story floor joists are resting on the wall, or parallel as the joists you can see. Be aware that you are dealing not just with the dead weight of the wall, but lateral thrust loads as well. The roof of your house pushes not just straight down on the walls, but tries to push them outward as well.

If you have never done anything like this, I don't think this repair is a DIY job.

 
jlcalbre's Avatar
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 119
VA

03-08-07, 10:21 AM   #3  
I've replaced some sill plate and rim joist, but a section that was perpindicular to the floor joists so it was a bit easier. I think I will have someone do it, with me on their heels to learn a little bit.

 
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