Framing Back Porch for sunroom...

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Old 08-02-07, 01:31 PM
Z
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Question Framing Back Porch for sunroom...

Okay the wife & I are thinking about getting the back porch (about 8' deep x 13' wide) framed off so we can eventually make it a sunroom. At the moment we cannot afford all the materials like windows, door, insulation, bricks, etc. since we're about to have our first baby BUT we'd still like a place where we can sit outside with as little heat, flies, etc. as possible so I had the idea of framing it off flush with the back of the house & just making a screened in porch until we can get the rest of the materials.

My question(s)...

1) How much is really involved in framing something like a back porch off? (It just doesnt seem like much if you've got the right tools & an idea of the process!?)

2) Would it work to frame the porch off & put up screen until we can afford the other materials or would framing for a screened in porch differ too much from what I'd need for the sunroom?

3) What all tools would be involved & could someone give me an idea of the framing process? Is it basically pre-building the framing & raising it up to secure it?

To me it just seems all I'd need to do (framing wise) when I was ready to complete the sunroom is frame off where the windows will be?! Thanks in advance for any help you may be able to offer!
 
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Old 08-02-07, 07:45 PM
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Depending on how "finished" the porch is, you may only have to install subflooring, bottom and top plates and studs with window and door openings. Be sure to check your footings and piers, to make sure they are adequate for your location and the added weight of the lumber you will be adding. Is the porch framework 4x4 or 6x6? Hopefully you have existing 6x6 support. Once all is framed up you can apply screening with staples on the outside, in wait for the ultimate finish.
With no advertising intended and no solicitation made (that's a disclaimer) you may can get some ideas by visiting www.chandlerscarpentry.com and going to projects one. You will see 3 of 4 recent porch enclosures I did. Note the window sizes and door placements, etc. One has the original drop from the main house to the porch floor, and one has hardwood floors flowing from the dining room to the enclosure (personal choice).
Hope it helps a little.
 
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Old 08-03-07, 06:35 AM
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Porch

Some photos of what your porch looks like now would be helpful. Show how the porch is attached to the house, the post detail at top and bottom, and the bottom edge of the porch roof structure between the posts. You can post photos on Photobucket and give us the address. With a little more detail, we can make specific suggestions.
 
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Old 08-03-07, 08:20 AM
Z
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Thanks for the replies,

Chandler:

-"Depending on how "finished" the porch is, you may only have to install subflooring, bottom and top plates and studs with window and door openings."

The porch has brick walls on both sides so all it lacks from it being a complete enclosure would be the face of the porch being framed. I'm no framer but I assume that's kind of what your describing doing here, right?!

-"Be sure to check your footings and piers, to make sure they are adequate for your location and the added weight of the lumber you will be adding."

By footings I'm assuming you mean where the frame will be anchored at the bottom, it's a concrete slab. And by piers what are you refering to? Is this what the frame will be anchored to at the top? When I post pictures I'm sure you guys will get a much better idea of what I'm working with.

-"Is the porch framework 4x4 or 6x6?"

How can I go about finding this out?


WirePuller:

-"Some photos of what your porch looks like now would be helpful. Show how the porch is attached to the house, the post detail at top and bottom, and the bottom edge of the porch roof structure between the posts."

I will do this as soon as I get home from work this afternoon, to me it looks very "do-able" as far as framing it up & all. But I've never framed anything so I'll let you guys decide whether it's a "do-able" project or whether I should just pay an expert to do it.

Just to let you guys know, I'm the type of DIYer that hates to admit defeat so I'll be pretty determined not to pay someone to come do this! I'm just gonna have to make myself familiar with the framing process as I've done with all my past projects. I appreciate you guys help in helping me familiarize myself with this work.
 
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Old 08-15-07, 09:11 PM
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i see a few areas of concern. first, the wall you are proposing to close your porch in should be supported below frost depth, which means you need to cut the slab and dig out for a footing. if you dont, during the winter the soil below the slab will freeze and heave (expand) pushing the new wall upward just enough to wreak havoc on the ends and the roof framing.

Definitely do it yourself. just hire a structural engineer to give you some basic direction. you can manage the cost of the engineer by taking lots of photos and take them with you to meet with him/her.
 
 

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