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Supporting A House


LONDONDERRY's Avatar
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10-11-07, 05:52 AM   #1  
Supporting A House

I have a question about supporting a house. I have a brick stairscase that where never flashed against the house sheathing. So some time next week I'll be demoing the bricks out. I'm more that sure I have to replace not just the sheathing but all so the wall joists and sill plate at the foundation because of rot. However, the sill rim might need to be replaced as well. I have some lally coulmns that I will be using to support the ceiling/ floor joists. One end of the column will be placed on the concrete foundation in my basement and the other end will suppoirt the ceiling or floor joists. If I add these support columns, is if necessary to brace the second floor wall from the ouside or not? Or does that depend if I have to replace the rim sill or not?

Frank

 
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bigjax's Avatar
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10-12-07, 02:59 PM   #2  
Your floor joists on the first floor depending on the age of the home may be resting on the sill plate already, meaning that they have support already unless of course the sill is rotted.In that case you will need to take some of the weight of the sill slightly so the rim joist and sill can be replaced.Now if your wall studs have also started to rot it maybe light surface rot..... or maybe not , but it may be confined to a couple of studs you won`t know untill the wall is opened up.I would say if you tap on the wall in a few different spots with a hammer outside, you will be able to tell where the soft spots are and if supporting the second floor will be required. If your replacing just a stud or two, i would say you can get by with out supporting the second floor,but besure to get a new stud in as soon as possible then take the old one out.If the situation requires more then i would say yes definetly get the upper floor supported .
bigjax

 
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10-24-07, 11:37 AM   #3  
Okay here is an update. I was in my basement, which the concrete foundation is up to my waist, and I removed some drywall and saw that the sheathing has been eaten away by chipmuncks and squirrels as well as some of the wall studs. So the missing sheathing runs parallel to the ceiling joist. Tonight I'm going to add some lally columns to these ceiling joist. However here is my question, I have to replace the wall studs and the sill plate resting on the concrete foundation. If I support the ceiling joists from the inside of the house with lally columns, is if required to go out side the house and add braces above the sill rim at the exterior sheathing, or the sill that seperates the two floors. The braces would be nailed to the second floor wall stud from out side and the other end of the brace would be spiked into the ground? Remember the sheathing rot is parallel to the ceiling joist. Does this post make sense? Click on the link below
http://www.kodakgallery.com/ShareLan...fromshare&Ux=0
Frank

 
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10-24-07, 03:22 PM   #4  
You are good to go on the side that runs with the joists, replace studs as needed 1-2 at a time then resheath the wall before starting the other side holding up the joist..... if that is in need of repair also.....you may be able to brace
2x4`s under each joist in front of the area that needs repair but the same rule of thumb should apply replace a little make sure the 2x4s are braced under a joist in front of your repair on the inside ,(you may not have to put them outside,but if needed you will already have a plan ``B`` to make the repair).(>>>>Always have a plan B)
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10-24-07, 03:30 PM   #5  
frank,
in picture #2 it looks like you may be better off cutting out a larger section,possibly to the end of a sheet that is on the wall.Cut the whole thing out in one shot, frame in a new one on the floor and sheath it on the floor ,and get someone to help you lift it back into placed , (you will have a sheathed wall in one shot)By the way it looks like the wall leaks like a bugga so maybe ice &water barrier on the sheathing will make your wall last for many more years
bigjax

 
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10-25-07, 03:32 AM   #6  
Posted By: bigjax frank,
in picture #2 it looks like you may be better off cutting out a larger section,possibly to the end of a sheet that is on the wall.Cut the whole thing out in one shot, frame in a new one on the floor and sheath it on the floor ,and get someone to help you lift it back into placed , (you will have a sheathed wall in one shot)By the way it looks like the wall leaks like a bugga so maybe ice &water barrier on the sheathing will make your wall last for many more years
bigjax
BigJax-
Thanks for the reply. Last night I got 7 lally columns to support the section of the wall that need to be repairs. Upon closer inspection, the area with the big hole in it, will all so need to have the sill plate at the concrete foundation replaced as well. Question, if I wanted to build the frame on the floor, where should I make my cuts to remove bad wall section?
Lastly, if the rim sill( which seperates the two floors) is good and does not need to be replaced, just the sill plate and wall joists, is it necessary to brace the front secton of the house from the outside or not? I added 2 new pictures, that show a very recent project my father and I did, where we added outside wall braces and blocked them in. However the framing damage was about the same. I'm having a bit of an argument with him over adding bracing to the outside of the house this time around. My thinking is if the sill plate and wall studs are gone, then adding some temp lally columns to the inside of the house is all that is needed. Adding outside braces to the exterior walls is an overkill plus it take along time to do.

Frank

 
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10-25-07, 05:23 AM   #7  
#1 cut the old plywood straight down the side of a stud with a sawzall, then get an overall measurement back to the outside corner for your plywood length while its all open.Next cut a couple 2x4 plates put them up on the sill , lay out where the studs go making sure the sheetrock will break on a stud when it comes time to do it, put the whole sheathed frame in nail it off top and bottom making sure it is plumb.
Becareful with your lolly columns if the are adjustible,(just a tweak up is all that may be needed .Your floor joists with the lolly columns under them run in under the bottom plate the bottom plate supports the wall above.I`m not sure how much you are replacing there but, if you go more then 4ft -6ft then it may not hurt to add a couple in.Double check all before removing anything.

 
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10-25-07, 09:02 AM   #8  
So from reading your posts, it sounds like I do not have to all bracing to the outside of the house?

 
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10-25-07, 12:34 PM   #9  
correct...,as long as you have support below joists inside in the area your working you will be ok...

 
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10-26-07, 03:32 AM   #10  
Posted By: bigjax correct...,as long as you have support below joists inside in the area your working you will be ok...
Thanks a lot I really appricate it. So in what scenerio do you add outside braces and blocks to a house? BTW after I removed all stair case. It looks like a section of the outer sill rim might be rotted. So what is the best way with dealing with this? Can I remove a section of the sill rim and splice in a new one? IF so then, how much material should I remove

Frank

 
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10-26-07, 03:52 AM   #11  
Yes, but make sure all the other work below it is completed first then cut the rim joist down the center of a floor joist and install a new piece.

 
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10-26-07, 05:36 AM   #12  
Posted By: bigjax Yes, but make sure all the other work below it is completed first then cut the rim joist down the center of a floor joist and install a new piece.
Is this because if I cut the rim joist and remove all the wall studs and sill plates at once, the rim joist is unsupportive and could sag? Even though I'm using lally columns to support the joists inside the house, but there is no way to support the remaining sections of the rim joist?

Frank

 
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10-26-07, 08:18 AM   #13  
Once the wall studs have been replaced and everthing is solid below the joists then you set the joists back down on its final resting spot before replacing the rim.This prevents one joist being higher then the other and an even plain....

 
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