Lightweight concrete floor


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Old 04-05-08, 06:10 AM
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Lightweight concrete floor

I have a lightweight concrete floor on the second floor of a 40 year old building. It appears to have deteriorated somewhat. It is cracked, crumbled, and generally turned to dust in places.

What product is suggested for overlaying this concrete floor to make it acceptable for flooring, whether it end up carpet, laminate, or tile? Removing all of the floor is not an option. Removing the most damaged areas is not out of the question however, as long as I don't have to remove large areas that do not appear damaged at all.
 
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Old 04-06-08, 05:22 AM
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Good morning, md.

I am not familiar with the term, "lightweight concrete" I will assume, that you would treat it like any other concrete and apply a self leveling compound, after ridding the surface of all loose material.

Someone more knowledgeable than I will surely come along with a more definitive answer.

Connie
 
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Old 04-06-08, 07:11 AM
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Lightweight concrete floor

Do you have real lightweight concrete (quite hard) or gypcrete (softer, weaker and light in color)?

I believe there ther materials that are compatible with it for leveling after you have reached a sound surface.

The flooring people out there would know more about them than I do.

Dick
 
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Old 04-07-08, 04:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry
Do you have real lightweight concrete (quite hard) or gypcrete (softer, weaker and light in color)?
At this point most of the floor appears to be concrete, but the parts that are bad look more like grout that is coming up. Never seen gypcrete.
 
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Old 04-07-08, 04:33 AM
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Could you post a picture for us?
 
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Old 04-07-08, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by connie
Could you post a picture for us?
It's not really worth the effort... There can't be too many types of masonry sub-floor.
 
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Old 04-07-08, 03:48 PM
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We wouldn't (likely) be able to determine what type of masonry from a picture. What we would be able to see is the type of damage that needs repaired.

I'm fairly certain, if it is in fact concrete, my first answer is suitable, but perhaps it would be best to get a specialist to look at it.

Connie
 
 

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