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Framing a pantry from an exterior wall


Wallee's Avatar
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Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1
NY

06-17-08, 07:29 PM   #1  
Framing a pantry from an exterior wall

This is my first time here so I would like to say thanks before hand to anyone who is able to help me out. I just bought house and I knocked out everyting in the Kitchen and I am left with just the studs. The problem I am having is I am not sure whether the wall that I want to arch (which is an exterior wall) is able to be widened and arched. I am not sure whether this wall is load bearing which would mean it cannot be modified (I should say can not be modified in a cost effective manner since I am on a tight budget) As you can see from the attached pics the door which is now a closet/pantry in the Kitchen will be removed and the space will widened by about a foot and a half to the left (since that is all the space left in pantry)and arched. This will hold a refridgerator and some pantry space on the side. I also took a picture of the beams at the top and there is some sag. Does anyone think this can be done? The pictures show what the back of the wall looks like from the outside and the others shows how it looks from the inside. Can anyone help me?

Link with pictures
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/?saved=1

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,298
NE

06-18-08, 10:06 AM   #2  
Anytime you make an arch, there needs to be a header over the highest point of the arch. If the peak of the arch is too close to your floor joists to get the header underneath, then you'd likely want to build some temporary floor supports, remove enough floor joists and blocking to get at the space for the header. Assuming you have balloon framing, you'll probably also need to lag a temporary header onto the studs ABOVE the header (above the floor?) so that things stay put when you cut the studs. So this may mean opening up the wall above the floor so that you can do that... as well as opening up a space so that you can nail your existing studs to the top of your header. If you've got some experience in construction this would not be a big deal to do... but if you've never done anything like this, call in some of your construction buddies to help.

 
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