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How many fasteners for attaching sill to foundation?


jonzilla's Avatar
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10-01-08, 07:12 PM   #1  
How many fasteners for attaching sill to foundation?

Hello,

This is a diagram of the side of a carport which is being turned into a garage.

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A few questions:

Is it okay to leave the steel pipe supports in place and go with the framing segments between them?

What type, diameter, and how many fasteners should I use for the sill?

Is it okay to use green lumber (cheaper) or should I be using kiln dried for this project?

Thanks for any tips and suggestions on this,

Jon

 
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10-02-08, 05:08 PM   #2  
Couple of questions of my own. Why are you using double bottom plates? Why are you using 96" studs rather than 9 5/8" studs? Why 15" felt rather than Tyvek? (OK more than a couple) Why is your footing only 6" wide?
Leave the pipes in place as they are providing original support and will not protrude outside your wall.
Use either 2 1/2"+ powder actuated fasteners or Tapcon screws (again, on a single pressure treated bottom plate.
"Green Lumber" as in Pressure treated, or as in you just cut it in the woods? Pressure treated for the bottom plate and kiln dried wood for the framing above the plate.

 
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10-03-08, 05:25 AM   #3  
chandler offers good advice, I will reiterate that you should be using a single pressure treated 2x4 sill plate, not (2) 2x6's. Also i'll address the potential consequences of wind load. Hopefully you are attaching the top plate to something above, whether it be steel or wood. whatever the case, a heavy wind load would act to shear those plate anchors out of the footing without the top being attached. as added precaution you should lap the 7/16 sheathing over the joints (where the steel is) to further reinforce each seperate wall section.

ps. 6x9deep footings seem inadequate, but i'm not necessarily suggesting that you beef them up since your only adding wall load. just food for thought

TGIF Beer 4U2

 
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10-03-08, 04:11 PM   #4  
Posted By: chandler Couple of questions of my own. Why are you using double bottom plates?
Hi Chandler,

I am using double bottom plates because if I only use one I would have to buy 10' studs and cut them down to 97.5". By doubling up on the sill, I can just buy standard 96" studs. Mind you, this is my own thinking, so please offer up any other efficient solutions (maybe single sill, and double up the top plates?)

Why are you using 96" studs rather than 9 5/8" studs?
Eight foot studs are a standard item around here (Oregon), and stocked by my local yard.

Why 15" felt rather than Tyvek? (OK more than a couple)
For this small project, I would have a lot of tyvek left over, and it would be more affordable to do it with felt. I don't have enough money to do everything the best way possible, so I have to settle with doing it well enough.

Why is your footing only 6" wide?
That is the width of the existing foundation, which is part of the foundation for the rest of the house.

Leave the pipes in place as they are providing original support and will not protrude outside your wall.
Use either 2 1/2"+ powder actuated fasteners or Tapcon screws (again, on a single pressure treated bottom plate.
I'm guessing the 2.5" fastners refer to the length? I am looking for information on what diameter of fastener, how many per section, and how deeply they should protrude into the concrete.

I was planning on using a masonry bit to drill the holes out, as I already have an impact drill, and use expansion bolts.

"Green Lumber" as in Pressure treated, or as in you just cut it in the woods?
Green as in a regular 2x4 but not kiln dried before it is sold.[/quote]

Pressure treated for the bottom plate and kiln dried wood for the framing above the plate.
Thanks again, Chandler, I do appreciate your help.

===============================================

Ohio - thanks for the tips. The foundation is actually 6" wide, and extending down 21"; the 9" was reffering to the depth above ground (sorry I didn't mention that).

Fasteners for the top into the header will just be standard nails. Speaking of which, those headers are covered with a 1" trim board; will I be able to nail my top plate to the headers through the trim board, or am I going to have to remove the trim board (leaving the pipes without support)?

Thanks.

 
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10-04-08, 04:44 AM   #5  
Put the second plate on top rather than bottom if you plan on using the 8' lumber for studs.
2 1/2" powder actuated pins only come in one diameter and fit the gun that shoots them in the plate. Space them about every 3' or so. Try to miss where your studs will be placed as they can protrude slightly. But if you want to use expansion bolts, spacing would be the same, but only use 3/8" in diameter. The expansion bolts, although you have the drill, will be a PITA compared to using a ramset or tapcon. I have a motorcycle, too, but can't pull the construction trailer with it. Right tool for the job.
Definitely kiln dried. Green lumber will shrink and twist.

 
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