level house that is out by 8" front to back


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Old 10-20-08, 12:16 PM
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Exclamation level house that is out by 8" front to back

My house was built in the 50's and is out 8" from front to back, settled many yrs ago I'm told. I'm looking at jacking it up to level. I have been trying to do as much research as possible and looking for an advice from ppl who have done simliar jobs. I'm expecting to use about 10 (20ton) jacks spread around the basement and lots of lunmber to spread the load underneathe. Expecting to use 4x6's mounted to the joists jack on. The joists are all laid into the concrete foundation walls, and I'm told they should just "pop" out, give or take some sledge hammering. Expecting to jack it in small increments to minimize and more cracked walls etc. Any input appreciated, thnx.
 
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Old 10-20-08, 04:12 PM
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IMO, you should contact a licensed and insured house mover, who could raise the house for you. They usually get steel I-beams into the basement which will keep everything straight, and evenly supported. IMO, using pc of 4x6 would be asking for trouble.

If you do decide to DIY... house movers install cribbing as they raise the house. Cribbing is made of heavy 4x6 or 6x6 pc of oak, hickory, or other dense wood, which they stack flat- 2 pc about 4 ft apart going one direction then on top of that, 2 pc about 4 ft apart perpendicular to the first pair (to form a square) and they continue that to build a column. As the house is raised higher, they stack additional cribbing to support their steel I-beams as soon as it will fit.
 
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Old 10-23-08, 11:24 AM
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Thanks for insight. Contractors are in high demand here and I can barely get a someone out to give me a estimate, nevermind do the job anytime soon. So me and some friends are going to take a 'crack' at lifting it. Were thinking about strapping 3 or 4 -2x8's together and run them the length of both sides of the house, which including the middle beam in the house would give of us 3 points to lift on. And spread out at least 12 jacks under the beams. Yes some sort of cribbing under the jacks to spread out the pressure. Would using a 4x4 or 6x6 post as the extension between the jacks and the beams support the load OR maybe a some telepost? I know I have to find some thick steel plates. Thanks for any input.
 
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Old 10-23-08, 04:19 PM
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I'm getting nervous as I read this. I'd wait for a pro to become available.
 
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Old 10-27-08, 07:47 PM
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Every 1/2 inch or so go feel the joists with your hand. They tend to vibrate before they explode. This is the kind of job id price my self out of. Its doable but a lot can go wrong. Good luck. Are you sure its not a parched block foundation wall. Im pretty sure if it was built in the 50's it will be block, and when you lift the floor, you'll seriously f up the wall. I really hope you dont do this, and that if you do. Its a bungalo.

In terms of lifting technique, you are low tech but right on. (3) 2x8 should easily and safely support 12'. Throw some more colums in mid span.
 

Last edited by clawfirst; 10-27-08 at 08:01 PM. Reason: re-reading
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Old 10-28-08, 04:45 PM
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I'm with XSleeper and Mitch17. Of all the stuff we give advice on, this is definitely not a DIY challenge. An inch or so, sure, but you are talking the height of a concrete block! Not only are you taking the chance of being buried by this thing, but think about all the interior walls where you will be lifting. They will be trashed if not done in a correct manner. Wait for a pro to become available.
"Vibrate before they explode"....I'll wait for the movie.
 
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Old 10-29-08, 12:58 PM
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Its the honest truth, wood vibrates just before it fails.
 
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Old 11-21-08, 07:39 PM
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Hey Everyone, I figured I would give a little update on my project. Over a span of 3 weeks I have brought the house up nearly 5". Minor cracking in some of the plaster walls/celings but less than I expected. Obviousley I have been moving it in very small increments using 14 hydraulic jacks. I have decided that one more inch will be level enough. The only issue I have run into is the joists all run parallel to face of the house. So the last joist before the face is back 16" and the front lip of the house just rested on the foundation -sooo that front lip is sagging down about 1/2" because nothing is jacking directly under it. I have been pounding wedges under it for support but need to find a way to jack/lift it up. I can't find any sort of jacking device that can fit into the small gap of between 3-5 inches. Any ideas?
 
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Old 11-21-08, 07:57 PM
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I just saw a re-run of Dirty Jobs where they moved a house. They used some massive lumber, some steel I-beams and they had more than a few guys working. If this was a detached garage where you were jacking it up to pour a slab I would say jack away, but I'd let a pro handle this job for your house.

I am by no means an expert in anything house related, but I do love to tinker around the house and try to learn as much as I can. Figuring if I break it I can hire someone to fix it...but it's hard to fix a whole house.
 
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Old 11-21-08, 08:15 PM
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level house that is out by 8" front to back

It sounds like you are very ambitious and have done a good job.

Now, I will ask the key question - Do you know why it settled and do you expect what you have done remain level? If you don't know the cause and address that, how long do you expect the "fix" to last?

Dick
 
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Old 11-22-08, 08:39 AM
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For the narrow opening, you can rent a scissors type jack that resembles the jaws of life in reverse. They are used in body shops to correct damage.
 
 

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