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need advice on very sloped floors


mjjstang's Avatar
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Join Date: Apr 2009
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08-04-09, 10:03 PM   #1  
need advice on very sloped floors

I just purchased a house that was too cheap to pass up. I am first trying to stabilize it before I dump money into it to flip. however I have never run into an issue such as this and requires some bits of engineering to make safe. so this is the issue:

house built mid 70s, we believe it had major water infiltration b/c of mold which will be taken care of properly, but the floor right about in the middle of the house is sloped badly about maybe 1-2 inches out of level. I have sistered beams before in a room or two on previous flips, but that was due to rotting. We are fairly certain that this wood is perfectly fine. just by the looks of it the main beams were installed poorly, with the beam sitting between concrete blocks and wood shims that have since compressed like a mother.

so I plan to slowly raise the beams in key areas, maybe 2-4 different spots to become level and sturdy enough for peace of mind and floor treatments. If it comes to having to rip the subfloor and sister beams, then so be it, but I feel we can do this another way.

I propose using adjustable screw jacks that will distribute their load to the beams through a 1/4 inch steel plate of size larger than what comes with the jack, and then up to a 4x6 distributed over a couple joists.

After talking to some people about a base, I have concluded that digging a 18-24 inch deep 16 inch round or square hole and fill with concrete, should be a fairly stable platform instead of just cookies on dirt. Maybe put a steel plate down (would steel on concrete be a poor idea?) or I could lay down a concrete cookie on top of the concrete? i dont think that would really benefit anything, but I definitely want to spread the load a little on the lower side of the jack, like I will on the upper with the 1/4 inch plate.

So I have to believe that a few of these systems should allow me to lift the house back in to shape. I am not hugely concerned with a bit of cracking but feel if I did this all in one day it would result in huge issues. I would spread the raising over a few weeks or a month, and also let the concrete cure for about a week before loading on it.

This is in a crawl and I suppose it would not frost down there , (mid michigan, hopefully will insulate the crawl. There is a heater down there by the well pump that I really dont want down there) the guy I talked to did not reinforce his, but I was wondering should I put some horizontal/vertical rebar supports in a pad that is so deep? I think I am over engineering this but I want to be safe and really were talking a few dollars here.

Any better ideas?

 
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Pulpo's Avatar
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08-05-09, 07:04 AM   #2  
How many joists in all have to be lifted (total span)?

 
mjjstang's Avatar
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08-05-09, 12:25 PM   #3  
well I believe the main beam is the issue, so it will hopefully fix a lot of the problems by fixing that, but the individual joists may need some adjustment but I would probably span 3-4 at a time? I dont know. I am thinking 1 jack alone could span 2 joists wehre if I decided to do more then one jack on each side? I have not thought that far ahead I guess at this point.

 
GBR in WA's Avatar
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08-05-09, 01:02 PM   #4  
I would start by renting a laser level or making a water level to plan the attack. Write in chaulk the numbers at each location and on a master paper page to show the differences. Then you will know if it only some joists or a whole section of main bearing beam that needs to lift. Measure to the floor/ceiling at each location and write it down. Return the tool, dig and pour the piers where needed, with steel rebar and the wider the better on the piers. (especially if on poor soil.) Get back with us when ready to figure the pier sizes. Be safe, G

 
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08-05-09, 02:31 PM   #5  
I was thinking of an I beam across the entire span with jacks at each end. Raise the jacks, dig the footings, install the posts & you're done.

 
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