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Header spans and framing in a row house


bnymbill's Avatar
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 23
MD

08-07-09, 10:00 AM   #1  
Header spans and framing in a row house

I'm currently working on plans for a completely gutted row house. It has a concrete floor, brick walls on all 4 sides and is a center unit. Exposed brick has become quite popular, so I'd like to incorporate it into my design. The house is 11' wide and 36' deep. The home will have 3 floors; a 7' tall basement, a 7'8" 1st floor, and a 7'8" 2nd floor. The header span tables I've seen are for houses on foundations where the header is in an exterior, load bearing wall. Since my framed walls will basically be independent of the exterior construction of the home (4 brick walls) do the same header spans apply? Additionally, can I bolt a rim joist/ledger board to the brick side walls (running the length of the home) and attach my joists with hangers and provide no framed support wall underneath? Ideally, I'd like to have roughly an 8' span in a few rooms. So, I would bolt the rim joist to the brick foundation walls (which run the entire height, lenght, and width of the building) attach joists with hangers over the 8' span and frame walls with an actual 2 2x12 header over the 8' span. I would think that between the two forms of support - bolting to brick wall and 2 2x12 header, I should have no problem with an 8' span. A follow up question - what would be the best method to bolt the rim joist/ledger to the brick wall?

Thanks for your help.

John

 
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Concretemasonry's Avatar
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08-07-09, 10:28 AM   #2  
Header spans and framing in a row house

A header usually is the term for the member over an opening that can carry any loads without deflecting or moving so the doors and windows (just holes in a wall) will function properly.

Much depends on what loads are on the walls. The term non-bearing is only a general descriptive term and not always functional.

How do you propose to increase the ceiling heights without raising the roof?

If you must use a ledger, it should really be though bolted requiring access from both sides of the party wall or be prepared to buy a lot if drill bolts and throw away the drill in the end, depending on the type of brick or mortar..

 
bnymbill's Avatar
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08-07-09, 10:55 AM   #3  
Essentially, instead of a door or window, my holes in the wall be brick, purely for aesthetic purposes. The total height of the building will support my 3 floor plan. As currently constructed, the basement is 6' tall and the other two floors are each 8' 4". So I'm essentially reallocating height. I'm assuming 40 lbs/sq ft and the roof is independently supported by the brick walls (i.e. framing is not necessary to support the roof). Through bolting is not an option because the neighbors wouldn't appreciate it. What anchor or expansion bolts would you recommend? I'd only be doing this for about three 8' spans so over 24' I'd need roughly 27 bolts. This would allow me to alternate 1 bolt and 2 bolts between each joist on 16" centers. I think this, combined with a 2 2x12 header over the 8' span would not cause any structural concerns. I guess opinions on the previous sentence are my main goal.

Thanks again.

 
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