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Problem with misaligned wall


Ignis's Avatar
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Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 33
NY

10-15-09, 09:57 AM   #1  
Problem with misaligned wall

First, a little of my background. I am a relatively new homeowner. I am not the handiest person, but I am willing to learn and try.

Ok, so here is my best description of my situation.

The original house had a family room which was open to an entry foyer. So, if each "X" denotes a wall and each "_" denotes an open access way, the relevant corner of the family room looked like this from above.

_ _ _ X X X X X
X
X
X
X
X

Ok, so the prior owner decided to close off the family room and install a pocket door. "D" shows the door.

X X D D X X X X
X
X
X
X

When I removed all the paneling I realized that the 'new' wall (added by the prior owner surrounding the pocket door) does not line up with the original wall. The prior owner did not sheetrock the 'new' wall. He installed paneling directly onto the studs and it lines up perfectly with paneling installed over the sheetrock on the original walls. This is what the picture looks like, but I don't think it really helps capture the situation.



So, if I now sheetrock the new wall it will be offset from the sheetrock of the original wall. (We had planned to simply paint the walls and put new sheetrock where needed.)

So, now my best plan seems to be either (1) install sheetrock over existing sheetrock over the original wall to line up with sheetrock on new wall, or (2) remove all the sheetrock and attach something to the studs of the original wall to bring them out even with the new wall.

The existing sheetrock and any new sheetrock are both 1/2 inch.

Pros and cons of either plan? Suggestions?

Thanks.

 
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Mr. Fix It's Avatar
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 34

10-15-09, 07:15 PM   #2  
The road to hell was paved with good intentions.

The guy that built the wall did it right for him. I can only imagine that you wife is bugging you to get rid of the paneling and redo the drywall.

They are silly like that sometimes.

Mike Holmes has a old saying, the carpenter forgot 3 things.
His level and his square and his common sense.

Usually when a carpenter does something like this it is for a reason - although I can't see it.

Usually when a homeowner wants to change something, it is for a reason, maybe the wall allows more noise then you would like.

It's not something hard to fix, but you are going to need a bunch of tools to do the job and some common sense.

A square and a 6 foot level and a circular saw and a drill and a nut driver and a drywall T square and some drywall tools and a lot of patience. Rome wasn't built in a day.

The first thing that has to happen is to take down the paneling and do a reveal. Then you can see if they nailed the studs to the floor and the ceiling or if they screwed them.

Most lazy contractors takes the easy way out and uses the air nailer for everything. After all - they aren't going to live there and it only has to be good long enough for them to get out of the house - once they have been paid, you aren't going to see that contractor ever again.

If it is screwed, you can just take the screws out and move everything and rebuilt it.

Be sure not to just take a sawzall to the wall. There might be issues with the electrical or the HVAC inside of the wall. You never know what you are going to get into until you open it all up.

 
Ignis's Avatar
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NY

10-16-09, 05:43 AM   #3  
Ok, so that would be a third possibility I had not considered.

I had not thought about why the prior owner did it this way. Thanks for prompting me to think of that. I think that the reason the wall was built as it was is because intersecting the wall is another wall with a doorway pretty close to the intersection. That extra half inch might be enough to put the trim around the door in the space where the two walls meet.

A diagram to display this perpendicular wall:
(I have used "C" to show the door in this perpendicular wall. The "=" is just open space...just using the spacebar did not actually indent so the wall would not have appeared in the right place.)

======X
======C
======C
======X
X X D D X X X X
X
X
X
X

I think the bold X is not wide enough to allow for the new wall to have been built with the room for the sheetrock. (1/2 inch I guess.) I will have to measure the space.

The motive behind this renovation was to remove the old dated paneling. Before I knew about this problem we had agreed to simply sheetrock and paint. I may be able to do something else, but only if there is no other alternative. =D

So, the three possibilities are:

(1) install sheetrock over existing sheetrock over the original wall to line up with sheetrock on new wall, or

(2) remove all the sheetrock and attach something to the studs of the original wall to bring them out even with the new wall, or

(3) remove the new wall and rebuild it so that it lines up with original wall (hence, the sheetrock will line up).

I would appreciate feedback on the three possibilities. I think either (1) or (2) might work for me if there is no problem taking those paths.

I understand that rebuilding the wall would be the 'perfect' solution, however I am not certain that it is worth so much effort given how little space we are actually talking about. Also, if when I measure it out there is a problem with moving the wall, I will need to go with one of the other alternatives.

Thanks.

 
Wayne Mitchell's Avatar
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10-17-09, 08:32 AM   #4  
If it were me I would probably demo the wall and furr out the studs enough so that everything was even. Sheet rocking one wall isn't a big deal. If you are uncomfortable with getting a good surface finish you can usually find a sheetrock guy that will do the mud job after you put up the sheetrock.

"Most lazy contractors takes the easy way out and uses the air nailer for everything. "

Mr Fix it - I don't understand that statement. Nails are required by code. An air nailer is the most efficient, effective and approved method of nailing framing members. Why would it be the "easy way out"?

 
Ignis's Avatar
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Posts: 33
NY

10-17-09, 10:24 AM   #5  
The sheetrock is being torn down from the wall as part of my renovation. The studs will be bare. I am going to try installing the sheetrock and doing the taping and spackling. I am less inclined to remove the framework and redo that, though I could still be convinced, I suppose.

I was trying to figure out what I might use to attach to the studs to bring the walls even while I was at the lumber shop. (I gather these are sometimes referred to as 'furring strips'?) The strips I could buy to tack onto the studs were too big.

I need a strip that is actually (in measurement) a half an inch thick. (1/2 inch sheetrock appears to actually be 1/2 inch thick...who knew? ) The typical 1x2 does not cut it because a 1 inch side is about 5/8 inch it seems. This drove me to frustration and I figured, just use two layers of sheetrock and be done with this whole thing.

As the strip becomes more esoteric the cost seems to rise such that putting up two layers of sheetrock where required would be cheapest. So, is there a problem just doing that?

Will the sheetrock come tumbling down??

When the walls
Come tumblin' down
When the walls
Come crumblin', crumblin'

I think I am walking myself in circles...

Thanks.

 
Wayne Mitchell's Avatar
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Posts: 3,188
CT

10-17-09, 11:51 AM   #6  
You can rip 1/2" plywood and tack it to the studs and plates with a lazy man's finish nailer. Doubling the sheetrock is also an option. I would do the plywood simply because it's a lot lighter than sheetrock, cheaper and probably quicker.

 
Ignis's Avatar
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NY

10-19-09, 05:16 AM   #7  
Looks like I will go with either plywood or sheet rock.

Thanks for suggestions.

 
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