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Squeakiest floors you can imagine!


cuda7's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2009
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CANADA

12-04-09, 12:16 PM   #1  
Squeakiest floors you can imagine!

I am almost positive I have the squeakiest floors in the world. Even the cat walking down the hallway makes them squeak! They are 3/4" hardwood on top of 1x6 plank sub-floor that run 45 to the joists and nailed in with 2-1/2" common nails. I'm doing a full interior renovation so fixing the floors is high on my list. I pulled the hardwood out of the spare bedroom and it's definitely the sub-floor that is squeaking.

I'm thinking of using screws to pull the 1x6's to the joists and I would like to hear some feedback on what length of screw and how many per 1x6. Because of the 45 angle, each plank presents about 8-1/2" to the joist. There are currently 3 nails per 1x6 per joist. I don't really want to pull up all the nails if at all possible.

The other option I'd like feedback on is the use of nails instead of screws since I've got 700 sq. ft. of flooring to repair. Is this an option if the correct type of nails are used? What would be the correct type of nails to use in this situation?

Thanks.


Last edited by cuda7; 12-04-09 at 12:38 PM.
 
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chandler's Avatar
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12-04-09, 01:02 PM   #2  
1) plank subflooring is inadequate for hardwood installation. You need another substrate screwed through the planks and into the joists.
2) You should be using hardwood flooring staples or nails and driving them through the tongue at an angle. Your nails won't hold.
3) Use a flooring stapler to do the hard wood installation.

 
cuda7's Avatar
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12-04-09, 03:56 PM   #3  
Interesting... I'll see what I can do. Problem is my doors are 78" and I'm 77" and I don't want to be ducking through every door! There's about 1/2" clearance between the top of each interior door frame and the rough opening, so maybe I can squeeze in a layer of 1/2" plywood. I was planning on getting new door frames anyway, so that might work.

 
GBR in WA's Avatar
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12-04-09, 04:07 PM   #4  
I would add 3/8" or 1/2" plywood over the t&g boards after nailing them with 8d screw shank gun nails, 3 per board, face nailed. I find screw nails twist 1-1/2 times into or out of the wood. Ring shank blow the wood fibers away punching a hole from the rings. Be sure the joists below are protected from the seasonal changes or the boards will still want to move: BSI-009: New Light In Crawlspaces —
Be safe, Gary

 
PeteSTL's Avatar
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12-27-09, 08:51 PM   #5  
I would also suggest making sure you are doing something to control the humidity in your home too - a humidifier, with a digital humidistat will help you greatly in limiting expansion and contraction due to humidity. One like the Aprilaire 600a, or honeywell has some too. Pick out based on your square footage. Make sure the floor is properly installed with roofing felt below as well. The other suggestions are good ones too. Good luck.

 
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