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What is this bracing for-HELP in middle of aproject with deadline getting closer

What is this bracing for-HELP in middle of aproject with deadline getting closer

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  #1  
Old 12-13-09, 11:34 PM
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Exclamation What is this bracing for-HELP in middle of aproject with deadline getting closer

Hi guys,
So im in the middle of remodeling my bathroom and the boss wants some glass block windows in this way. Check out the pic. In the upper right of the pic in red you will see where the glass block will be. There is a 1x4 thats getting in the way. im sure its needed right?

is it possible to remove/move this and make a frame for glass block?

thanks all!

 
  #2  
Old 12-13-09, 11:41 PM
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if i put this in the wrong section could an admin move it for me
thx
 
  #3  
Old 12-14-09, 01:25 AM
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Hi rugsr, I think they are all asleep as I should be .
I've seen that style of bracing in older construction and it works very well, but not sure if it is still necessary or just overkill. If the wall has sheetrock on both sides, that brace will give it more stability. Todays outside walls with plywood or osb don't need the extra bracing IMO, but taking out what is there, not sure what an inspector would say. I'll get out of the way so the pros can step in. Keep the boss happy.

Bud
 
  #4  
Old 12-14-09, 06:31 AM
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Thanks Bud,
actually on the exterior they used some kind of cheap crap compressed board. I found a few wet spots, old i think, that were all swelled up to wear i can put my finger through the wall with a little force.

In the spring I plan on taking the siding down, replace it all with plywood, putting some insulation board on there(right now its crap foam) then siding back up.

AND YES...id like to keep the boss happy
 
  #5  
Old 12-14-09, 07:12 AM
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Having the glass block window unit in that position will create small problems with trim, if you plan on using any. Using good sense, the unit can be moved to the left 10" and down probably 4" to make for a perfect fit, room for trim, and a lot less work. The brace was put in for a purpose, and can probably be removed, but that original purpose would be negated by doing so.
When you frame for the window unit (or individual blocks) measure carefully and do your framing 1 1/2" wider and taller than the window unit so you can install a case frame. I know you have already researched it, but installing glass blocks is an easy task, but your measurements should be somewhat exact.
 
  #6  
Old 12-14-09, 08:14 AM
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I think "let in bracing" is a holdover from the days of plank sheathing. It provided stability to the wall and held it square. Plywood and OSB sheathing don't require it. I have never seen it used on an interior wall. Any chance that this was once an exterior wall?

In any case, I wouldn't be concerned about removing the brace. This appears to be a bearing wall so the opening you create will have to be headered.
 
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Old 12-14-09, 08:57 AM
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It's "let in", bracing,



it's designed to be there to prevent diagonal (racking) movement of the wall



potentially there is considerable load on it





and should not be removed or altered unless provision is made to reinforce the wall in some other manner.

See: Racking Strength of Walls: Let-In Corner Bracing
 
  #8  
Old 12-14-09, 09:09 AM
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Thanks guys,

Yes this is an outside wall and in that corner will be my new stand up shower. Thats why i wanted the glass block.

I thought about moving it over but then it wouldnt be even with my 4' wide shower. I also wanted to keep it high so no one from the outside could see it.

Is it possible to cut out the 1st 2 sections of the 1x4. Then cut in a new 1x4 on the interior side and go from wall to floor with it? Would that do the trick?

ALSO, the outside wood really isnt wood. Its that crap MDF or other crap board thats gets wet and breaks apart. I would like to replace it with actual plywood next spring.

I do live in buffalo and it can get windy. 1 week ago its was VERY windy and we just entered the winter months.

Let me know what you guys think
 
  #9  
Old 12-14-09, 10:06 AM
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I thought it was an interior wall and I was looking at the back side of sheetrock.

In my area that type of bracing is not required by code. If you are concerned because of the condition of your sheathing you might be able to run the bracing on the opposite diagonal. You may also be able to use strap (metal) or cable bracing on the inside of the studs. Check with your building inspector.
 
  #10  
Old 12-14-09, 01:30 PM
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It is a let-in 1x4 corner diagonal brace for shear flow at that end of the wall to transmit loads and earthquake forces safely without losing the racking strength of wall. It runs from plate to plate, the top portion hidden by the leaning lumber. The exterior pressed board sheathing required it due to it's minimal shear. ('70's time)
You can add another back from the corner, 33" maximum or per local building department. Easier to add this, RCWB- one saw cut: WB/WBC/TWB/RCWB Wall Bracing Scroll down......

Use a header: http://www.burlington.org/Building08/Spans.pdf
Be safe, Gary
 
  #11  
Old 12-14-09, 01:48 PM
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thanks guys,

due to time, id rather not order something and wait for it ot come in. Cant i buy a 1x4 or 1x6 and make a new "let-it" under the old let-in or maybe to the left of where the glass block will be?
 
  #12  
Old 12-15-09, 03:15 PM
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anyone?
.......................
 
  #13  
Old 12-15-09, 06:10 PM
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Yes. Add it close to the corner but just clear the window. Nominal 1-inch by 4-inch (25 mm by 102 mm) continuous diagonal braces let into top and bottom plates and intervening studs, placed at an angle not more than 60 degrees or less than 45 degrees from horizontal, and attached to the framing in conformance with Table 23-I-Q. ----- 1" (25 mm) brace to each stud
and plate, face nail
2-8d
Be safe, Gary
 
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Old 12-15-09, 08:13 PM
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Be aware, you will have to "let it in" the studs. Hope you are aware of the work involved. You just don't tack it on the stud face.
Gary, wonder if he could get by with one of those extruded single slot metal bracings. Sure would save a lot of cutting and chiseling.
 
  #15  
Old 12-16-09, 09:04 AM
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I should probably install the new let-in brace before taking part of the old out right?

Before I install the glass block or new window I need to rough frame it in. So ill need a 2x6 header and add 2x4 king studs under the header correct?

When doing any of this, should i buy those jack posts and support anything? IE ceiling right where im working?

once again thanks guys for your responses
 
  #16  
Old 12-16-09, 10:05 AM
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rug...just to clarify...king studs are the ones beside a header...jack studs are the shorter ones that actually support it.

Didn't read the whole post..but I'm sure they guys will be back to answer soon...
 
  #17  
Old 12-16-09, 10:43 AM
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Is that OSB sheathing to the left in the picture? If it is nailed on the studs, you have your shear flow. Add a header as per this: http://www.burlington.org/Building08/Spans.pdf

Chandler, great minds....... see post # 10.

What load is above, another floor and gable OR truss/rafter tails?

Be safe, Gary
 
  #18  
Old 12-16-09, 01:14 PM
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Thanks guys,

Above this floor are 2 bedrooms and above that is my crawl space. Nots sure if it matters but the way the roof is(4 triangles to meet in the center) means all for exterior walls are load bearing. My house is a split. This family room is on ground level. 5 stairs up is my living kitchen dining room then 8 stairs up are the 3 bedrooms

OSB, yes it is. It looks like there might have been damage or something around the sliding glass door at one point and that area was replaced with some OSB. I believe the OSB sheet spans 32" so two cavitys.

So, because of that OSB I can take out a little of that let-in and ill be ok? I dont need a new let-in on the inside?
 
  #19  
Old 12-16-09, 02:16 PM
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2. In the first story of two-story buildings, each braced wall panel shall be in accordance with Section 2326.11.4, Item 1, except that the plywood sheathing shall be provided on both faces, three anchor bolts shall be placed at one-fifth points, and tie-down device uplift capacity shall not be less than 3,000 pounds (1360.8 kg).

I'd go ahead and let a 1x4 in, as mentioned. Yes, support the two joists a few feet back (room to work) with a stud under each and screws. Before you start, drive two toenails (10 or 12d) on each side of the joists/rim joist connection for added safety above the window.
Be safe, Gary
 
 

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