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Is 3/4 inch tongue and groove common subfloor in older houses

Is 3/4 inch tongue and groove common subfloor in older houses

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  #1  
Old 02-07-10, 06:20 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Tennessee
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Is 3/4 inch tongue and groove common subfloor in older houses

Hey,
I have a 3 level house that was built in 1929 I believe. Obviously there have been many many hands on it in its life and who knows what has been changed and botched up.

One thing I have noticed aside from odd electrical issues on one circuit (breakers and romex cable thankfully) is that the flooring is oak tongue and groove with no subfloor beneath it. On the middle level where we spend most of our time there are no bounce issues with the floor but upstairs where I have been remodeling (painting and crown, etc. no major structural changes) I have noticed that the floor bounces anytime someone walks across it. This has me concerned and I am wondering if 3/4 or it may be 1 inch tongue and groove was a common subfloor for houses of this age?

I do know that a previous owner removed a load bearing wall almost directly under the floor that is bouncing the most up above where the wall used to be. She bragged about how they all told her it shouldn't be done but she finally found someone who could do it. Any putz will agree to do something nobody else will for a price. She did not find a genius that knew how to magically remove it and I more or less told her this. Beer 4U2 I suspect it is part of my bounce issue but I wonder about the safety of tongue and groove for a subfloor. After enough sanding and staining every 10 years or so it can get thin.

Thanks,
Rob
 
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  #2  
Old 02-07-10, 06:30 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: USA
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That bounce is from not having adequately sized floor joists. You are right about the removal of that wall. The subfloor isn't going to affect the bounce of a floor. The most you can sand a tongue and groove floor would be less than 1/4". So it's not like you will wind up with paper thin floors to worry about.

My house has a similar situation. The second floor is a finished attic. The floor joists are only 2x6 and they do bounce. Even the first floor bounces and they are 2x12.

I would get the spot where the wall once was dealt with. That could be a major problem down the road.
 
  #3  
Old 02-07-10, 06:39 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Tennessee
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Hey Drooplug,
Thanks for the reply. I have a bad feeling about that wall being removed. I need to have that checked out by a structural engineer. Other two floors are rock solid but the third is very questionable now that I am up there so much.

So I guess "in the day" tongue and groove was the subfloor and finished floor unless carpet was added.

Thanks for the info,
Rob
 
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