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Sloping skylight front/back walls (not sides though), any limits?


spup345's Avatar
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NY

10-02-10, 12:03 PM   #1  
Sloping skylight front/back walls (not sides though), any limits?

About to get started finally...

I'm going to be sloping the front/back of the skylight walls to enlarge the overall light entering the kitchen...I'll be keeping the sidewalls vertical from the roof down through the attic to my kitchen ceiling though (don't want to complicate the framing in the attic).

However, is there any limit as to how long I can make the front/back opening from the roof down to my kitchen ceiling? Or is it just personal preference?

There aren't any obstructions if I widen the opening and I'd rather get more light than less so I want to make it maybe 6' long (rough opening is 44x46"...but in the kitchen ceiling it'll be 44x72" give or take)...

 
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10-03-10, 03:36 AM   #2  
I'm trying to mentally draw what you are doing. Your hole in the roof/ceiling will need to be the size of your skylight. There are limitations as to how much you can offset the light. You don't want to defeat the built in curb....that is your water protection to the unit, so once you install the over-curb flashing, the unit will be water tight. You won't get any more light by making the opening bigger. Now if you are talking about making your tube longer/wider, you can do whatever you want, just don't mess with the factory seals of the skylight.

 
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10-03-10, 04:01 AM   #3  
Yea, talking about the tube and you answered that, I can make the tube bigger to my liking. Thanks.

 
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10-03-10, 05:34 PM   #4  
Be certain to insulate the skylight shaft in the attic and use recommended thermal break material at wood/skylight. Use an rv paint in the shaft to protect from the sun there. The insulated glass panes in a window change thermodynamically when in a sloped application (skylight), to lose way more heat due to the shorter convective loop between panes: pp.4 - illustration: Powered by Google Docs
Buy a quality unit for peace of mind.

Gary

 
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10-05-10, 05:56 PM   #5  
Can you clarify "thermal break material"? Are you talking about the insulation or something else?

And can you also define "rv paint"?

Thanks for these extra little tricks of the trade that most rookies like I wouldn't realize. I'll be getting a Velux "no leak", so should be quality.

 
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10-05-10, 10:27 PM   #6  
Lol, sorry about that! Uv paint, if you are going with exposed wood trim to protect from the sun. Thermal break material, continuous strip of self-stick foam or a gasket between the metal and the framing wood. Think about adding a light rope around the inside of the shaft for a dramatic night-time accent. Use small wattage for a night light to compliment the toe-kick led's under the cabinets. No heat build-up.

Gary

 
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