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Any tips to keeping basement framing true?


Skoorb's Avatar
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10-19-10, 02:07 PM   #1  
Any tips to keeping basement framing true?

I have framed most of my basement, some of the walls done 6+ months ago (took summer off). Of these perhaps 75 studs 1-2 have become very untrue, the rest pretty much look the same as when I put them in place. One in particular has twisted to kingdom come. I used KD lumber from home depot or lowes and checked each before installing for excellent straightness. I end-nailed (or honestly in most cases end-screwed after pilot-holing) most of these, so this one that has twisted just wanted to be like that. I'll probably replace it.

Is horizontal blocking overkill? Maybe even block every second hole to attach studs in pairs? I don't want to waste time but wonder if I should bother with that. I feel that once drywall is in place it will offer some stability benefit to the wall in any case.

 
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10-19-10, 02:25 PM   #2  
Stretch a string across the face of the studs about 1/2 way up, to make sure the wall will be true. As far as the twisted studs, replace it/them. Blocking is required in some jurisdictions, and is a good idea to keep twisting to a minimum. If you block, do it in every bay. They rely on each other for support. Skipping one will allow movement. Drywall won't hold a stud from twisting.

 
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10-19-10, 03:24 PM   #3  
Horizontal blocking it’s a pain but is required as mentioned

On an 8’ ceiling I usually stagger the horizontal blocking at approx. +3’ and +6’ in one space and then on the next space I use only one block at approx. +4.5’ and so on. Some people prefer 2 blocks per space, nothing wrong with that either.

Making the blocks about 1/8” longer so they will fit snag between the studs make the installation easier. Also make sure the blocks sit flash with the front face of the studs.

 
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10-19-10, 07:30 PM   #4  
Well I just spent the evening putting in 27 blocks into all the recent walls. The old aren't going to change much so I'll sort them out later on. The new were still good other than a stud or two a little twisted but even the others, when I got up really close, were starting to twist a bit, too, so I clamped them in and then screws on either end, to really lock that wall up. I didn't internalize the idea of two blocks every second bay until re-reading this, so I am with one. I think that will be ok, though. Reviewing pics on the net a lot of people don't block at all. It would make future wiring more of a hassle but I think it was worth it.

 
Wayne Mitchell's Avatar
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10-20-10, 06:37 AM   #5  
As Chandler posted, blocking is not required in some areas - at least not in mine. I agree with pulling the twisted studs. They're cheap and easy to replace before the DW goes up.

Two twisted studs out of 75 is pretty good. What kind of screws did you use to build the walls?

 
Skoorb's Avatar
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10-20-10, 07:11 AM   #6  
Posted By: Wayne Mitchell As Chandler posted, blocking is not required in some areas - at least not in mine. I agree with pulling the twisted studs. They're cheap and easy to replace before the DW goes up.

Two twisted studs out of 75 is pretty good. What kind of screws did you use to build the walls?
Well I suppose in closer inspection twisted only refers to "wow that is really twisted, time to come out". Some of the others are twisted/bowed upon closer inspection enough that the blocking twists them back and/or I'll have to take them out.

I used decking screws. 3" They are not to code for framing a house due to a tendency to snap after too much shear, whereas a nail will bend and not snap, but the main force these ones have to fight is wood twist/bowing (so, not much at all), and pull-out there is what I wanted. I also prefer putting them in because I can ensure better lining up of wood (I'm not a pro) and the 1-2 times I've had to take a stud out it's been great to have the screws.

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What sort of tolerance should I be ok with for stud continuity? If I hold a flat edge against all the studs, what degree of gaps should be ok? 1/8" for bowed studs? 1/4"? What will show up through the drywall?


Last edited by Skoorb; 10-20-10 at 09:18 AM.
 
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