how to connect framed basement wall sections

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  #1  
Old 02-21-11, 09:55 PM
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how to connect framed basement wall sections

Greetings,

I am a newbie DIY'er and I have recently started framing my basement. Maybe this is a silly question. My exterior wall is approx 36ft long. I obviously cant buy 36 ft plates. I have used 12 foot plates and measured 15 1/4 from the end of first plate and then proceeded to frame 16 o.c. for the rest of the 12 foot section. My question is how do I connect the next 12 ft section? The way I did it was to repeat the process of the first 12 ft section and butt the ends of the plates together. Was this wrong? Should I not have placed a stud at the begining of the second plate and repeated 15 1/4 measurement etc... Should I have measured 16 oc from last stud of first 12 foot section to place the first stud on 2nd plate? Any info is much appreciated.

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 02-22-11, 03:53 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Your bottom plate (pressure treated) will be connected to the floor using Tapcon screws, concrete nails, or powder actuated drive pins. I try to have my plate end under a stud, but sometimes it isn't practical, and it isn't devastating if you don't. They are fastened. You need to make corner studs comprised of 3 studs and a few scraps of 2x4 so you will have something to nail your inside corner sheetrock to. See an example here: http://www.extremehowto.com/xh/article.asp?article_id=60256That's your starting point. After you stand that stud in place and fasten it to your top plate (plumb) you would measure over inside to inside 14 1/2" (only on basement type walls) and make a mark. That is the edge of your next stud. Mark on down your plate 16" from your first mark and that will give you the edges of all your studs. Of course at the end you won't have exactly a 16" spacing, but that's life. For some reason, unexplained, I like to work a room counterclockwise. I do it with framing and with trim. Having a constant method leads to fewer mistakes.
You seem worried about your bottom plate. Worry more about plumb and square, and the floor will take care of itself.
This is not exactly how I frame, but it is very informative, and you may glean from it all you can: Building a Wall 2 - Layout | DoItYourself.com
Let us know if you have more questions. We're here.
 
  #3  
Old 02-22-11, 11:13 AM
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Thanks for the info. Still not quite clear though. I have been using the build on the floor and raise into place method, not stick building. I have squared and plumed the 12 ft sections. I have anchored with tapcon screws and nailed into joists. You are correct, at the end of my built frame section it is not 16 in o.c. I understand this is common. I guess what I am still unclear on: when I build my next 12 ft section on the floor which will continue along the same straight 36 ft wall do I place the first stud at the begining of the new 12 ft plate and measure 15 and 1/4 like I did on the first section or do I measure 16 o.c from the last stud in the first 12 ft section?
Thanks
 
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Old 02-22-11, 03:00 PM
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Nope, 16" oc all the way across. You will fasten the plate to the floor. If you want to feel warm and fuzzy, after you install the new section, install a 14 1/2" piece of 2x4 in the bay where the joint is and nail down into the bottom plate. Now, don't get carried away with the 15 1/4" thing. Once you determine your first stud space, it is 16" full measurement from right edge to right edge of the studs. I never measure to center, as you will cover the mark with your stud and lose it. Measure to an edge. Now if you are measuring the entire plate, then 15 1/4, 31 1/4, 47 1/4, etc. It is basically 3/4" short of the center of the stud.
 
  #5  
Old 02-22-11, 03:42 PM
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You can do it either way but if you leave the stud out you will need to at least add a short (2 foot) piece to the last stud in the first wall to tie the top and bottom plate to the first wall. It is just as easy to just build the 3 walls separate and stand them up and screw or nail the double studs together. But remember you start the drywall 3/4 of an inch from the wall, this means the drywall on the 1st wall ends in the center of the last stud at 12 feet. So you will have to take that 3/4 inch off the next section. Meaning the center of the 2nd stud in the 2nd wall will be only 15 1/4 from the end of the 12 foot plates. Then the rest will be 16 inch on center, until the last stud in the 2nd wall which will be 3/4 of an inch inside the 12 foot plates. This will make the 1st stud in the last wall need to extend past the plate by 3/4 inch (toward the 2nd wall) making the 2nd stud in the last wall need to be 14 1/2 inch to the center from the end of the plates. Also remember that some 12 foot 2x4 lumber is over 12 foot exactly so make sure you measure the plates and cut them at exactly 12 feet.
There are other ways to do it but since you are only using a single top plate and the wall is not load bearing the 3 separate walls screwed or nailed together will be just fine.
Now I know all this sounds complicated and it is somewhat. But to make it simple cut you plates to 12 feet exactly. The lay them on the floor end to end and side by side and mark the 16 inch centers on the plates. Then you will be sure the drywall will fit. Otherwise it might not.
The way I lay out a wall is to mark the plates at 15 1/4 inch and mark for the leading edge of the stud then place an X after the mark to indicate the placement of the stud. This means the mark is beside the stud not in the center of it. Then with the tape measure still hooked over the end of the top plate I mark all the next studs 3/4 of an inch short of the 16 inch center mark on the tape measure and place the X past my mark to indicate where the stud goes.
That is all done on the wide flat part of the 2x4 not the edge. Then after marking the entire top plate I place the bottom plate next to the top plate and transfer the marks and X onto the bottom plate using my speed square to span both 2x4 at the same time, carrying the mark fully across both 2x4.
I hope I have helped you and not confused you more!
 
  #6  
Old 02-23-11, 06:42 AM
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Thanks a lot for all the pointers. I guess I screwed it up. I took all 3 of the 12 ft sections and measured 15 1/4, 31 1/4, etc on each section and then just placed a stud at the end of the each 12 ft plate and started again at 15 1/4, 31 1/4 etc on the next section....Oh well. Hopefully can still be dry walled, just be a bit more difficult. Thanks again for the knowledge.
 
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Old 02-23-11, 04:40 PM
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It's gonna be downright impossible to hang rock. As long as we are willing to learn, take your tape measure and hook it on one end of the wall. Now, every 16", you must have a stud. You will be OK on your first part of the wall, but see what happens as you approach that joint you made? You will have to install studs at the 16" on center points, and you won't have ANY after the first section. Check it out. Measure completely from one end to the other for your studs.
 
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Old 02-23-11, 06:27 PM
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I don't see the big issue with hanging the drywall. He will just have to seam his sheets on the seam between his two wall sections for it to lay out right.

Add another stud at the seam where your plates are and make sure they are nailed to each other as well. That will ensure that your drywall will work.
 
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Old 02-24-11, 12:41 PM
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For a DIY'er to finish a cut laying next to a finished edge, you would be pushing the envelope. If he runs his third sheet and installs a stud there, he can do it, but his 16"oc spacing is shot, unless he lucked up and had exactly 12' pt lumber for his plate.
 
  #10  
Old 02-24-11, 02:20 PM
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Another rather easy option is to pull the nails & anchors at the top & bottom plates for the 2nd & 3rd sections. Then re-adjust as needed making sure that you are back to 16" on center. If you have to cut 3/4" off the top & bottom plate or leave a 3/4" gap then do so, it will not matter once finished. Once you make the move to the 2nd section, the 3rd may fall in line. If you have a gap or need a nail edge at the corners, just use scrap pieces as needed. Remember as said earlier, none of these walls are load bearing or structural, thus just get them straight & plumb.

As a side note when drywalling, I would probably not make my drywall seams at the same place where the sections meet. Once you cut & screw in your first sheet with this in mind, all the others will fall into place accordingly. Good luck & keep building.
 
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