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Installing elevated wood floor in garage conversion.

Installing elevated wood floor in garage conversion.

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  #1  
Old 02-22-11, 01:55 PM
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Installing elevated wood floor in garage conversion.

Hey, new poster here. Here's my issue. We have a pier and beam house with a garage that the prior owner converted. It is just off the kitchen. The prior owner just laid down carpet over the concrete floor in the garage. The kitchen and rest of the house are P&B, so the kitchen floor is about 8-10 inches higher than and steps down onto the carpeted concrete in the conversion area.

I want a seamless transition. I would like to create an elevated floor in the conversion by creating a wood framework upon which I would lay subfloor and then the wood flooring. I know to use a vapor barrier, but do I use it directly upon the concrete and also another in the subfloor? Do I need to ensure some kind of ventilation in the 8-10 inches of open space between the concrete and subfloor?

What else am I missing?

Thanks!!!
 
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  #2  
Old 02-22-11, 02:51 PM
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Welcome to the forums! You will need to find out EXACTLY what the rise will be including subflooring, tar paper and wood flooring. Subtract these items from the overall height difference and that is the size lumber you will need. You may need shims as well to ensure the new joists are level. Laser levels are wonderful. Put your vb on the concrete and set the joists on the vb and attach them to rims around the perimeter. Don't nail through the vb. Place your subflooring on and you should be within 7/8" of the old surface in the kitchen. Add your 15# felt and hardwood floor and skate.
I am not sure how you plan on addressing the garage door unless it has already been done.
 
  #3  
Old 02-22-11, 03:13 PM
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Yes, thanks for the response. The garage doors (which were at the rear of the house) have already been removed and framed over. One other issue is that when it rains, there currently is some moisture that develops along the concrete at the side exterior wall. How do I ensure that issue is properly addressed, and again do I need any form of ventilation in the open space between the concrete and subfloor? Also, there is no central air extended into the garage area. If I wanted to do that, how would I best be able to entend the subfloor ducts into the garage area? Specifically, without knowing what it is called, there is the concrete foundation wall/perimeter around the P&B system which exists between where the kitchen ends and the garage starts. Am I or someone I hire supposed to extend the ducts through that by excising a hole in it in order to duct through under my new flooring?
 
  #4  
Old 02-24-11, 02:33 PM
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Sorry for the delay.....silly, had to go to work. Don't lay the first board until the moisture problem is averted. It will only cause headaches later on and you don't want to pull this puppy up to remedy it later. Find where it is going in and fix it from the outside. Any interior repair you make may not last and will be inaccessible in another month. Once you think you have it addressed, flood it with a garden hose.
Do you have any overhead HVAC in the other part of the house? I would recommend having a HVAC pro out to see if extending to this area would be feasible and what they would recommend. They may discount their price if you do the "excising" for them to get a clear run.
 
  #5  
Old 02-25-11, 06:00 PM
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I wouldn't use a impermeable plastic vapor barrier on the concrete. When using rigid foam board, the water vapor from the slab is slowly released to mix with the room air. Using a v.b. there will cause a wet musty smell found in damp basements from pooling water. Read pp. 2, #3; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...g-your-basment

Do not ventilate the space, install batt insulation next to the plywood, no v.b. here either, the ply is a vapor retarder itself. Run the supply duct for the forced air heat to a new register.

Gary
 
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