framing a shower stall

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Old 04-05-11, 03:23 PM
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framing a shower stall

When framing a wall next to a shower stall, should the wall be flush with the edge of the shower base
or should there be some distance so the shower base it tucked in?

I haven't decided if I am going to use a shower curtain or a door.
Would this make a difference?


wall to be flush with shower base (keeping room for drywall and possibly tile)




wall beyond the shower base



pros or cons for both methods would be helpful.

Thanks,

DK
 
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Old 04-05-11, 03:51 PM
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You need that wall to run past the pan at least 4" so you can cover the outside area with paper less drywall. No dry wall should be in the wet area at all, except up over where the wall is tile or the top of the enclosher falls. Only cement 1/2 tile board is used in a tiled area.
I leave out the center studs until the plumbing is done then frame around it so you know where the valve and the drop leg elbow needs to be blocked.
I like to add a 2 X 6 to the back side of the last 2 X 4 up againt the pan. That way no matter what there's something soild to screw to.
Tiling going to be a whole lot more work, and cost plus it will need to be resealed every few years.

For a 100% leak proof and low maintaince wall use a nail on enclosure. If you install one of these leave the bare studs, no drywall or anything behind it. Buy the walls and look at the directions on where the extra wall studs need to go.
 
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Old 04-06-11, 03:10 AM
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If you tile, make sure that the backer cement board comes down only to the top edge of the shower base lip, and do not overlap it on the base lip. The tile however will go over the lip and should sit no closer than 1/8 inch off the base. That gap can then be sealed with matching colored tile grout caulk that now even comes with the sanded grout look. Only use the regular grout on the flat tile surfaces and use colored caulking on the inside corners as well as along the base to provide the necessary flex required to avoid cracking and grout failure.
 
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Old 04-06-11, 06:50 PM
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Thanks for the tiling a cement board tips. I'll be sure to use them.

Unfortunately, I can't bring the wall out 4" because then I won't clear the 15" minimum requirement from the center of the flange to the wall.

I also can't move the pan back furhter because the drain is already cemented in.
(see picture)


Because I didn't do the best measuring, do I need to add furring strips to the 2x4's so the cement board will be snug and tight?
It might be better if I used 2x6's on this wall instead of 2x4's. There will still be a gap but not as much if I stay with 2x4s.
Is there a different option other than adding furring strips?



On another note, I originally had this measured for a 28" door, however I just read that a 30" door is the required minimum for a basement bathroom.
How much room should I allow for the door frame if I am going to put in a 30" door?


I do appreciate the help. This is my first "big" DIY project.
 
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Old 04-07-11, 10:40 AM
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On a 30" wood panel door you need to allow for the jams and space to adjust and shim. Depending on how thick the jams are, generally allow 1.5 inches plus another inch for shimming, so 2.5 inches. Keep the rough in studs level and plum. Not sure what your question really is still around the shower walls. The studs should be right up against the tray. The cement board should then come down to the top edge of the tray lip but not touch it. Allow a small space of 1/8" that can be filled with silicone to keep the board off the tray. Even cement board can absorb water. Tile then glued to the cement board with thinset overlaps the lip down to the tray ledge and grout caulking is then applied along that seam. If you have not framed it right, take it apart and do it right. Don't try to fool around with furring. Make the walls the right size to fit the tray. Work arounds only end up with more issues than you think you solved with them. In this case you will end up with problems with the width of the door jams that will be undersized for one thing.
 
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